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Sep 07

Book Notes 9/6/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 7, 2021 at 12:05 PM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

9/6/2021


Join us for our first art exhibit opening in over a year! Works from the River Forks Watercolor Society are on display September 10 - October 31. Opening reception: September 13 at 5:30 pm. More information


Untamed by Glennon Doyle

Soulful and uproarious, forceful and tender, Untamed is both a memoir and a galvanizing wake-up call. It offers a piercing, electrifying examination of the restrictive expectations women are issued from birth; shows how hustling to meet those expectations leaves women feeling dissatisfied and lost; and reveals that when we quit abandoning ourselves and instead abandon the world's expectations of us, we become women who can finally look at our lives and recognize: There She Is. Untamed shows us how to be brave. As Glennon insists: The braver we are, the luckier we get.

306.893 DOYLE | Also in e-book and e-audiobook


Northern Light by Kazim Ali

Power, Land, and the Memory of Water // An examination of the lingering effects of a hydroelectric power station on Pimicikamak sovereign territory in Manitoba, Canada. In a place where water is an integral part of social and cultural life, the Pimicikamak people demand accountablitily for the harm caused by the utiltiy. Here celebrated poet and essayist, Kazim Ali, explores questions of land and power as he reconnects with a lost connection to his childhood home Jenpeg.

811.6 ALI


The Burning Blue by Kevin Cook

The Untold Story of Christa McAuliffe and NASA's Challenger Disaster // January 28, 1986. NASA's space shuttle Challenger exploded after blasting off from Cape Canaveral. Christa McAuliffe, America's "Teacher in Space" was instantly killed, along with the other six members of the mission. At least that's what most of us remember. Cook tells us what really happened on that ill-fated, unforgettable day. He traces the pressures that triggered the fatal order to launch on an ice-cold Florida morning. He takes readers inside the shuttle for the agonizing minutes after the explosion, which the astronauts did indeed survive. Centering on McAuliffe, Cook reveals the human price the Challenger crew and America paid for politics, and the tragic cost of humanity setting its sight on the stars.

363.124 COOK


Seeing Ghosts by Kat Chow

A Memoir // Kat Chow has always been unusually fixated on death. She worried constantly about her parents dying---especially her mother. A vivacious and mischievous woman, Kat's mother made a morbid joke that would haunt her for years to come: when she died, she'd like to be stuffed and displayed in Kat's future apartment in order to always watch over her. After her mother dies unexpectedly from cancer, Kat, her sisters, and their father are plunged into a debilitating, lonely grief. With a distinct voice that is wry and heartfelt, Kat weaves together a story of the fallout of grief that follows her extended family as they emigrate from China and Hong Kong to Cuba and America. Seeing Ghosts asks what it means to reclaim and tell your family’s story: Is writing an exorcism or is it its own form of preservation? The result is an extraordinary new contribution to the literature of the American family, and a provocative and transformative meditation on who we become facing loss.

975.4 KURCZY


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

Jul 16

Backyard Astronomy by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on July 16, 2021 at 1:40 PM by Genesis Gaule

My parents were the first ones to introduce me to the wonder of the night sky---showing me how to identify the Big Dipper, pointing out the Northern Lights on late night drives, and even waking me up in the middle of the night to watch a meteor shower. I can still picture me and my siblings huddled in our blankets with our parents eating Oreos at the end of our driveway, competing to see who could count the most “shooting stars.” One night, we were lucky enough to catch a fireball light up the sky! These cherished childhood memories, and more I’ve made along the way, continue to fuel my desire to venture out into the night to see what’s on display in the heavens.

And according to amsmeteors.org we might be in for a treat July 17 - August 26, 2021. Known for its high volume of meteors with clear persistent trains, the Perseids are one of the most popular showers in the Northern Hemisphere. This year, it will peak on August 11-12 when the moon is only 13% full and will set in the early evening, providing dark skies for this year’s Perseids. In cloudless rural locations, it may be possible to see 50-100 shower members per hour! Many of the meteors will radiate from a point in the constellation Perseus, but you’ll be able to see them in any part sky after 9:00pm. They tend to strengthen in numbers into midnight, with the most meteors just before dawn. 

So go enjoy a beautiful night under the stars--find yourself some dark sky, bring the snacks, and keep your fingers crossed for a fireball!

Want to dive a little deeper into backyard astronomy? Check out these titles from our library!

Constellations

A glow-in-the dark guide to the night sky
by Chris Sasaki

Easy 523.8 SASAKI // Bring your flashlight to storytime and explore the stars with this glow-in-the-dark picture book! Featuring the stories behind some of the most famous constellations, this child-friendly introduction to the night sky is a perfect mix of simple science and storytelling.


The Young Astronomer

A young enthusiast's guide to astronomy
by Harry Ford

520 FOR // Award-winning astronomer Harry Ford, brings a hands-on approach to astronomy to budding stargazers ages 10 and up. Filled with experiments and projects that help explain how a lunar eclipse happens, how to spot a planet, and how to make your own stargazing equipment.


Eyewitness Handbooks: Stars and Planets

A visual guide to the night sky
by Ian Ridpath

520 RID // New to the night sky? This practical field guide features clear, easy-to-use star charts and is a great introduction to constellations, the solar system, and celestial objects for middle-grade and high school readers.


Discovery Channel: Night sky

An Explore Your World Handbook
by Mary Kalamaras

520 KALAMARAS // Designed for astronomy enthusiasts new and seasoned alike, this authoritative field guide combines fascinating information on the fundamentals of the universe with practical advice for identification and observation techniques, full color star maps, and an alphabetical guide to all 88 constellations.


The Backyard Astronomer's Guide

Third Edition
by Terence Dickison and Alan Dyer

522 DICKINSON // Looking for a more technical approach to stargazing? This in-depth manual gets the amateur astronomer started identifying celestial objects, using telescopes, and photographing the night sky.

Apr 02

Our Next Exploration Goal: The Universe by Cody Rasmussen

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on April 2, 2021 at 10:13 AM by Genesis Gaule

milky-way-photographed
Space.  Since ancient times, mankind has looked to the sky and has wondered: what exists beyond our world? Seeing the stars they would believe that above our world was the realm of the gods and other celestial beings. This fascination with space and the unknown has passed through the millennia, resulting in spectacular feats of human ingenuity. Our reach for the stars has led us to create the first airplanes and jets, culminating in the creation of satellites, rockets and other spacecraft. We have landed humans on the Moon and sent rovers to Mars, we are in the process of attempting to plan settlements on the Moon and Mars. Mankind’s thirst for exploration has not abated in the slightest.

The Andromeda Galaxy

Space exploration has inspired authors to write fantastic works of science fiction, creating new worlds and alien races across the universe. Space Operas such as Star Wars and Star Trek have inspired our youth to continue to look at the stars in wonder.  The book series of Dune inspired scientists to name features of Saturn’s largest moon,Titan, after planets. New astronauts and engineers are going into training, hoping to continue to push the limits allowing humanity to explore new worlds.
first-space-shuttle-launched

Humanity has always known that space exploration would either remain a dream to last the ages, or would be our saving grace. We are slowly losing our home planet to ourselves, and over the next few centuries there will come a time when our world will need to make a choice. Whether we should stay on our planet and attempt to save it...or take to the stars and continue one of mankind's greatest desires: exploration.


After all, the Space Opera Star Trek says it best.


“Space: the final frontier.”