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Sep 07

Book Notes 9/6/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 7, 2021 at 12:05 PM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

9/6/2021


Join us for our first art exhibit opening in over a year! Works from the River Forks Watercolor Society are on display September 10 - October 31. Opening reception: September 13 at 5:30 pm. More information


Untamed by Glennon Doyle

Soulful and uproarious, forceful and tender, Untamed is both a memoir and a galvanizing wake-up call. It offers a piercing, electrifying examination of the restrictive expectations women are issued from birth; shows how hustling to meet those expectations leaves women feeling dissatisfied and lost; and reveals that when we quit abandoning ourselves and instead abandon the world's expectations of us, we become women who can finally look at our lives and recognize: There She Is. Untamed shows us how to be brave. As Glennon insists: The braver we are, the luckier we get.

306.893 DOYLE | Also in e-book and e-audiobook


Northern Light by Kazim Ali

Power, Land, and the Memory of Water // An examination of the lingering effects of a hydroelectric power station on Pimicikamak sovereign territory in Manitoba, Canada. In a place where water is an integral part of social and cultural life, the Pimicikamak people demand accountablitily for the harm caused by the utiltiy. Here celebrated poet and essayist, Kazim Ali, explores questions of land and power as he reconnects with a lost connection to his childhood home Jenpeg.

811.6 ALI


The Burning Blue by Kevin Cook

The Untold Story of Christa McAuliffe and NASA's Challenger Disaster // January 28, 1986. NASA's space shuttle Challenger exploded after blasting off from Cape Canaveral. Christa McAuliffe, America's "Teacher in Space" was instantly killed, along with the other six members of the mission. At least that's what most of us remember. Cook tells us what really happened on that ill-fated, unforgettable day. He traces the pressures that triggered the fatal order to launch on an ice-cold Florida morning. He takes readers inside the shuttle for the agonizing minutes after the explosion, which the astronauts did indeed survive. Centering on McAuliffe, Cook reveals the human price the Challenger crew and America paid for politics, and the tragic cost of humanity setting its sight on the stars.

363.124 COOK


Seeing Ghosts by Kat Chow

A Memoir // Kat Chow has always been unusually fixated on death. She worried constantly about her parents dying---especially her mother. A vivacious and mischievous woman, Kat's mother made a morbid joke that would haunt her for years to come: when she died, she'd like to be stuffed and displayed in Kat's future apartment in order to always watch over her. After her mother dies unexpectedly from cancer, Kat, her sisters, and their father are plunged into a debilitating, lonely grief. With a distinct voice that is wry and heartfelt, Kat weaves together a story of the fallout of grief that follows her extended family as they emigrate from China and Hong Kong to Cuba and America. Seeing Ghosts asks what it means to reclaim and tell your family’s story: Is writing an exorcism or is it its own form of preservation? The result is an extraordinary new contribution to the literature of the American family, and a provocative and transformative meditation on who we become facing loss.

975.4 KURCZY


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

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Aug 31

Book Notes 8/30/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on August 31, 2021 at 10:46 AM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

8/30/2021


September is Library Card Sign-Up Month. Library cards are free for all East Grand Forks residents, East Grand Forks teachers and students. More information


The Joy of Sweat by Sarah Everts

The Strange Science of Perspiration // A taboo-busting romp through the shame, stink, and strange science of sweating. Sweating may be one of our weirdest biological functions, but it's also one of our most vital and least understood. In The Joy of Sweat, Sarah Everts goes behind the taboo and delves into its role in the body-and in human history. She reveals the wondrous mechanics of the sweat glands and the millions of sweat pores in human skin. She explores why sweat is salty, why what you eat can affect the color of your sweat, and why we sweat when stressed (and whether it can be controlled). She takes part in a sweat dating event, traces the controversial history of antiperspirants and deodorants, considers the purported health benefits of saunas, sweat lodges, and hammams, and investigates whether "eyewitnesses" to a crime may someday be replaced by "nose-witnesses" who can pick a suspect's body odor out of a police lineup.

612.7 EVERTS


How Iceland Changed the World by Egill Bjarnason

The Big History of a Small Island // Provides a tour of the history of Iceland, from the time a Viking captain ran aground there 1,200 years ago to the pivotal role it played during the French Revolution, the moon landing, and the foundation of Israel.

949.12 BJARNASON


The Outdoor Scientist by Temple Grandin, Ph.D.

zion-unmatched

The Wonder of Observing the Natural World // Dr. Temple Grandin introduces young readers to geologists, astrophysicists, oceanographers, and many other scientists through a series of projects to understand the world around them.

508 GRANDIN


The Quiet Zone by Stephen Kurczy

Unraveling the Mystery of a Town Suspended in Silence // Deep in the Appalachian Mountains, Green Bank, West Virginia, is a place at once futuristic and old-fashioned. It is home to the Green Bank Observatory, where astronomers search the depths of the universe using the latest technology. With a ban on all devices emanating radio frequencies that might interfere with the observatory's telescopes, residents live a life free from constant digital connectivity; schoolchildren go without WiFi or iPads. Kurcxy introduces readers to a tech buster patrolling the area for illegal radio waves; "electrosensitives" who claim that WiFi is deadly; a sheriff's department with a string of unsolved murder cases dating back decades; a camp of neo-Nazis plotting their resurgence from a nearby mountain hollow; and ordinary citizens seeking a simpler way of living. Kurczy asks: Is a less connected life desirable? Is it even possible?

975.4 KURCZY


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

Aug 16

Book Notes 8/16/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on August 16, 2021 at 2:49 PM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

8/16/2021


Did you know that our ebooks and e-audiobooks are available 24/7 on the Libby app? Use your library card to check them out and get reading!


Punch Me Up to the Gods by Brian Broome

A Memoir // Brian Broome, whose early years growing up in Ohio as a dark-skinned Black boy harboring crushes on other boys, propels this unforgettable book. Brian’s recounting of his experiences reveal an outsider, awkwardly squirming to find his way in. Escalating drug use and other relievers help to soothe his hurt, but it causes devastating effects.

306.76 BROOME


Breath by James Nestor

The New Science of a Lost Art // There is nothing more essential to our health and well-being than breathing. Yet, as a species, humans have lost the ability to breathe correctly, with grave consequences. Making even slight adjustments to the way we inhale and exhale can jump-start athletic performance; rejuvenate internal organs; halt snoring, asthma, and autoimmune disease.

613.192 NESTOR


The Light of Days by Judy Batalion

zion-unmatched

The Untold Story of Women Resistance Fighters in Hitler's Ghettos // A group of Jewish women in Poland helped fight the Nazis. These women paid off Gestapo guards, hid revolvers in loaves of bread and jars of marmalade, and helped build systems of underground bunkers. An unforgettable true tale of war, the fight for freedom, exceptional bravery, female friendship, and survival in the face of staggering odds.

940.53 BATALION


Edison by Edmund Morris

Thomas Alva Edison was the most famous American of his time, but he is mostly remembered only for the invention of universal electric light. Edison patented 1,093 inventions and left others unlicensed for the benefit of medicine. Morris addresses theories about Edison and Nikola Tesla and presents proof of their mutually admiring, if wary, relationship.

621.3092 MORRIS


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive