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Sep 04

The Emotional Rollercoaster of Reading by Miranda Millette

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 4, 2020 at 11:54 AM by Genesis Gaule

My favorite thing about books are the emotions that come with them. Complete surprise, giddy excitement, aching sadness—whatever it is, a book has to be pretty phenomenal to have you feeling the emotions as completely as the characters do. My most favorite books are my favorites because they had this emotional element that created a connection with me as a reader. Book lovers, do you know what I mean?

Has a book ever left you in tears? The closest I’ve come to this is after the devastation of a particular moment had me lying in shock on my bed, the voice in my head wailing for a good ten minutes before I could continue reading my book (The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness). The conclusion of this series also left my mind screaming, my reaction amplified as there were no more pages to turn to quell my shock. (I happened to read this series over quarantine while school was online, so I may have been reading instead of working on my project for art class or writing my essay for english…)

Meme of Jack Sparrow lying on the ground with the caption help. That feeling when you finish a book

What about a book that leaves you stifling the urge to throw it across the room? After a cliffhanger in the middle of a series (Dread Nation by Justina Ireland), it was a battle not to do this. I was so astonished, however I was grudgingly applauding the author and her work. (Unpopular opinion: I’m all for a well placed cliffhanger or a shocker such as the tragic death of a beloved character, because then it makes the book more memorable!!!)

What about a sudden plot twist that you never could have expected? One book (Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo) had me silently sitting in my chair, my brain whirling but me slightly smiling because of the pure genius and unexpectedness of the protagonist’s scheme (and, in turn, the author’s genius to create this plot). This book astonished me because of the author’s ability to cause readers to not realize that the hero was tricking us along with the villains.

It’s incredibly amazing how authors can continue to surprise us readers. I often wish that I could reread my favorite books like it was my first time, with no idea what the pages hold and no memory of their plots. But since I can’t magically give myself amnesia for this sole reason, I will continue to get more books in hopes of having another great adventure.

Meme of Bilbo from The Hobbit running towards the camera with the text I'm going on an adventure!

Aug 21

Family Book & Movie Night by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on August 21, 2020 at 3:09 PM by Genesis Gaule

Bring out the blankets and popcorn! Here’s three book-to-screen picks for your next Family Movie (and Book) Night. Check out both formats with our Front Door Pick Up Service and let your family decide who did it better--the movie or the book.


Book cover smiling giant sits on a rock holding a small girl in his open hand who is talking to him

The BFG

by Roald Dahl
Formats:
Book, CD, e-aduio
Ages: 7 and up

A young girl in a nightgown stands next to a pair of giant feet, staring up looking off screen

The BFG

PG | 2016
Format: DVD
Ages: 8 and up

Sneaking about during the Witching Hour, Sophie spies a giant blowing what looks like a trumpet into the window across the street. Being found out, the giant whisks her away regaling her about the many ways giants like to eat humans. But if this Big Friendly Giant isn’t looking for a midnight snack, why did he kidnap her?

Roald Dahl’s unique humor and wordplay bring this tale about discovering friendship and family in the unlikeliest places to life. With an imaginative world and a bit of gross-out humor, The BFG has loads of appeal for young readers and makes it a delightful book to read out loud. Parents should be aware of minor racial insensitivity typical of the 1980s, which can work as a good talking point for families.

The movie's dark tone may be intense for younger viewers, but its moments of sweetness mirror the book’s themes of empathy and courage.

Talk about it together! ReadBrightly Discussion Guide

Love Roald Dahl? Also check out James and the Giant Peach in book, CD, and DVD

a young pre-teen girl in a simple renaissance dress, flashes a mischievous smile to the view

Ella Enchanted

by Gail Carson Levine
Format:
Book
Ages: 11 and up

Portrait of Anne Hathaway in a princess crown, smiles at the viewer; a unicorn, castle, and rainbow

Ella Enchanted

PG | 2012
Format: Blu-Ray
Ages: 9 and up

When Ella was born, Lucinda the Fairy bestowed upon her a "gift": that she shall always be obedient. Now, anyone can order Ella to do anything--regardless of whether it's dangerous or in her best interests. Can Ella break the spell and choose her own path?

This book is a great pick for lovers of fairy-tale fantasy for older kids (and adults, too). With a bit of romance and a handful of adventure, this engaging and story is bound to charm with its clever, empowering twist on the classic Cinderella trope.

And although it takes on a sillier tone and departs significantly from the book, the movie is still a fun, high-spirited romp for fans of movies like Shrek and The Princess Bride.

Talk about it together! Scholastic Discussion Guide [PDF]

Bridge to Terabithia

by Katherine Paterson
Formats:
Book, e-book
Ages: 10 and up

Preteen boy and girl walk through an archway to a land of giants and castles

Bridge to Terabithia

PG | 2007
Format: DVD
Ages: 10 and up

Escaping their reality of overbearing parents and bullies at school, two preteen outsiders--Jess and Leslie--form a fast bond creating their own magical kingdom of Terabithia. It not only becomes their safe haven from their real-world problems, but also a source of strength to solve them. But when a tragic accident shatters their idyllic world, one is left to cope with their grief without the other.

The Bridge to Terabithia is a thoughtful drama laced with light fantasy adventure. Both the book and the movie tackle mature themes of loneliness, parental affection, bullying, and death through its captivating, tender story of an unforgettable friendship. An excellent choice for tween readers, it offers a lot of topics for families to talk about together. Reading or watching, prepare to have tissues ready; this one may get your tears flowing.

Talk about it together! Scholastic Discussion Guide [PDF]


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

Aug 14

Books for Science and SciFi Fans by Acacia James

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on August 14, 2020 at 1:41 PM by Genesis Gaule

You can check these items out through our Front Door Pick Up Service or by scheduling an appointment to browse in the library.


How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems by Randall Munroe

Format: Book (502 MUNROE)
Genre: Non-Fiction / Humor
Themes: How-to, Humor, Informative, Educational, Science, Math

This book is no ordinary how-to book. Unlike other how-to books that might tell you how to bake the perfect cake or knit the coziest sweater, this book will make you think differently about the traditional way we do things. Instead, this book might suggest that you launch the cake into the sun to bake or train mice to knit the sweater for you. All of this while telling you what velocity you would have to launch said cake into the sky to reach the sun, and how many weeks it would take to train said mice along with some helpful tips on how to do so. Humor is so nicely tied into this book full of science and instruction. I couldn’t read it without laughing!

Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

Format: Book (510.92 SHETTERLY), young readers' edition e-book, DVD
Genre: Nonfiction / Biography; Historical Fiction (DVD)
Themes: Drama, Comedy, Sexism, Racism, Educational

The book Hidden Figures, set in 1961, is centered around three black women: Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson, and Dorothy Vaughn. All three women work at NASA Langley Research Center during segregation in the United States. Katherine works as a human computer along with others at the research center. Segregation laws make it so Katherine has to walk half a mile to use the nearest colored bathroom. Mary Jackson is an aspiring engineer who is trying to take the mandatory classes necessary to become an engineer for NASA. The problem is, the classes are taught at an all-white school. Mary has to overcome prejudice and belief as she tries to pursue her career. Dorothy learns about an upcoming super computer that is going to be installed at NASA, making the working human computers obsolete. In response, she teaches herself and later other women how to code in the hopes that they could keep their jobs. These women are all segregated by their race and gender, but they don’t let that stop them in the pursuit of their careers and equality. This book is empowering for everyone, and it gives a small glimpse at what life was like for people of color during these times.

The Martian by Andy Weir

Format: Book (Science Fiction WEIR), e-book
Genre: Science Fiction
Themes:Space, Man Versus the Natural World, Adventure, Drama, Science, Isolation, Perseverance, Fear

A fierce storm forces a team of astronauts to evacuate from Mars. The team of astronauts leave behind fellow crew member Mark Watney after he is presumed dead. Mark Watney is left to fend for himself with deep wounds from the storm and only a small amount of provisions to survive off of. With no way to communicate and everyone on Earth thinking he’s dead, there is no help coming. With all of the odds against him, Mark doesn’t give up. He will do anything he needs to do to survive. But surviving is no easy feat, things can go wrong at every turn. Mark has to overcome: bleeding out, starvation, dehydration, low oxygen levels, freakish storms and much more. This book is full of action, anticipation, and leaves you wondering and wanting more. This book has also been turned into a movie featuring Matt Damon!

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

Format: Book (Junior WESTERFELD)
Genre: Dystopian Fiction / Science Fiction / Young Adult Fiction
Themes: Appearance, Futuristic, Betrayal, Dystopian, Adventure, Friendship, Society and Class, Conformity

Tally Youngblood is an ugly. She is desperately waiting for her sixteenth birthday to come so she can have the life changing operation to make her a pretty. In Tally’s world, everyone is born an ugly. They are kept in a small town called Uglyville that is secluded from the rest of the population. When an ugly has had the surgery they move to New Pretty Town. Uglies aren’t allowed in New Pretty Town and get punished if they are caught sneaking in. Once an ugly turns sixteen, they can get an extensive surgery to make them pretty. A perfect jawbone, slim waist, fit muscles, big eyes, flawless hair and more. What every person would want, right? Tally has waited her entire life to become pretty so she can see her already changed friends, and start a life of partying and nonstop fun.

Everything changes for Tally on the day of her sixteenth birthday. Her newfound friend, Shay, runs away after declaring she doesn’t want to get the mandatory surgery. Instead of getting the operation on her birthday, Tally got an ultimatum. Find Shay and bring her back, or never become pretty. Tally is forced to make a decision. Betray her friend or give up the life she has always wanted.


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!