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'picture books'

Jun 03

Tough Times by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on June 3, 2022 at 10:11 AM by Genesis Gaule

What should I do? How can I help? 

Uff, the news is tough now. When we hear about people being hurt and killed, there is a tremendous amount of sadness our communities share. When the lives of children and our vulnerable are ended or permanently damaged, we feel a loss that can’t be easily removed.

So what do we do? How can we help?

Did you notice how the questions changed from the first line? From I to we. Yes, first I take care of myself. Then we look beyond ourselves and care for our community.

There is no fixing what has already happened, but we can look around us and see who needs our support, our consideration, patience, time and a fair shake. Even as I write this, tears build from the losses in our beautiful nation. 

“Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.”
--Soren Kierkegaard

Between backwards and forwards is now. Might I suggest we take the moment to pause. Breathe. Sincerely reflect on what has happened and consider what we’re going to do next. Let’s make conscious choices that will lead to a peaceful and beautiful place for all of us to live in safety. 

Our library offers materials that give ideas on how to locate peace during chaos or at least be reminded of its existence. The library shares these materials with patrons in hopes that there is a bit of comfort found in them. There is not an easy journey through tough times, but a smile goes a long, long way. Here are a few suggestions to find at the library:

Kids

  • can you say peaceCan you Say Peace? by Karen Katz
    Children around the world wish in many different languages for peace // Easy KATZ
  • When We Are Kind by Monique Gray Smith
    How the simple act of being kind affects all aspects of a child's life // Easy GRAY SMITH
  • Peace by Wendy Anderson Halperin
    How to promote world peace and find peace within oneself // Easy 172.42 HALPERIN
  • Wangari’s Trees of Peace by Jeanette Winter
    How one woman’s passion, vision, and determination inspired great change // Easy 333.72 WINTER

Adults

  • humankindHuman(Kind) by Ashlee Eiland
    How reclaiming human worth and embracing radical kindness will bring us back together // 241.4 EILAND
  • The Power of Kindness by Piero Ferrucci
    The unexpected benefits of leading a compassionate life // 177.7 FERRUCCI
  • Wild Communion by Ruth Baetz
    Experiencing peace in nature // 155.91 BAETZ
  • A Walk Around the Block by Spike Carlsen
    Explore the ordinary things we take for granted in our everyday life // 031.02 CARLSEN
  • World of Wonders by Aimee Nexhukumatathil
    In praise of fireflies, whale sharks, and other astonishments // 590 NEZHUKUMATATHIL

oil painting. idyllic lake with tree-covered mountains in background and a birch tree in foregroundEven a painting!

We can all be strong at times and have other times when a shoulder is needed. I have confidence in our community to offer that shoulder when needed. If each of us finds and offers a tiny bit of peace each day, our actions will help guide our elected officials, school administrators and employers to focus on keeping our communities safe. 

Mar 23

2022 ALA Award Winners by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on March 23, 2022 at 11:53 AM by Genesis Gaule

The American Library Association (ALA) recently announced their 2022 Youth Media Awards which honors books, videos, and other outstanding materials for children and teens. Here are this year's winners and honorees we have in our catalog!

Looking for past award winners? Check out our post about the 2021 ALA Award Winners.


watercress

Watercress

by Andrea Wang, illustrated by Jason Chin

Simple text and beautiful illustrations pack a strong emotional punch in this autobiographical picture book about gathering wild watercress that brings a daughter of immigrants closer to her family's Chinese heritage. An author's note in the back shares Andrea's childhood experience with her parents. // Easy // Ages 4 - 8

Check out these children's cultural picks:

nicky vera


fox at night

Fox at Night

by written and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor

Fox overcomes his fear of monsters when he meets real nocturnal animals. With repeating text bolstered by whimsical illustrations that provide cues to the story’s humorous plot, Tabor deftly uses sensory stimuli of sight, sound and smell to immerse young readers into the perils of the night. // Easy Reader Yellow // Ages 4 - 8

More award winning kids books:

beak ally

  • Beak & Ally #1: Unlikely Friends written and illustrated by Norm Feuti
    Theodor Seuss Geisel Award (2022 Honor) // Junior Graphic Novel // Ages 6 - 10 years
  • Mel Fell written and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor
    Caldecott Medal (2022 Honor) // Easy // Ages 4 - 8 
  • Wonder Walkers written and by Micha Archer
    Caldecott Medal (2022 Honor) // Easy // Ages 3 - 7

firekeepers

Firekeeper's Daughter

by Angeline Boulley
[Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians]

When University of Michigan student Daunis witnesses a shocking murder, she reluctantly agrees to go undercover, drawing on her knowledge of chemistry and Ojibwe traditional medicine to track down the source of a new drug. It's a page-turning YA thriller with gorgeous insight into Anishinaabe culture and a healthy dose of romance thrown in. // Junior (also in e-book and e-audiobook) // Ages 14+

More Native American award winners:


telegraph club

Last Night at the Telegraph Club

by Malinda Lo

America in 1954 is not a safe place for two girls to fall in love, especially not in Chinatown. Red-Scare paranoia threatens everyone, including Chinese Americans like Lily. With deportation looming over her father—despite his hard-won citizenship—Lily and Kath risk everything to let their love see the light of day. // Junior // Ages 14+

More award winning books for teens:

  • We Are Not Free by Traci Chee
    Asian/Pacific American Award for Youth Literature (2022 Honor) // Michael L. Printz Award (2021 Honor) // Junior // Ages 12+
  • Temple Alley Summer written by Sachiko Kashiwaba, illustrated by Miho Satake, translated by Avery Fischer Udagawa
    Mildred L. Batchelder Award (2022 Winner) // Junior // Ages 8 - 13
  • Me (Moth) by Amber McBride
    John Steptoe New Talent Award (2022 Winner) // William C. Morris Award (2022 Honor) //  ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults (2022 Top 10) // Junior // Ages 14+
  • Ace of Spades by Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé
    William C. Morris Award (2022 Honor) // Junior (also in e-audiobook) // Ages 14+
  • Starfish by Lisa Fipps
    Michael L. Printz Award (2022 Honor) // Junior // Ages 10+
  • Concrete Rose by Angie Thomas
    Michael L. Printz Award (2022 Honor) // ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults (2022 Top 10) // Junior (also in e-book) // Ages 14+
  • Light from Uncommon Stars by Ryka Aoki
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences // Science Fiction
  • The Witch’s Heart by Genevieve Gornichec
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Science Fiction
  • Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwel
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Science Fiction
  • The Rose Code by Kate Quinn
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Fiction (also in e-book)
  • Lore Olympus, Vol. 1 by Rachel Smythe
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Graphic Novel
Dec 17

A Cup of Tea by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on December 17, 2021 at 10:48 AM by Genesis Gaule

A lovely cup of hot tea and a good book: Perfection, especially on a cold day as winter moves through our area!

I don’t recommend eating peanut butter and jelly toast while reading. Certainly, don’t try Cheetos and a library book. Please, never eat mashed potatoes and gravy while enjoying your favorite story. But a cup of tea can be managed nicely.

There are so many kinds of teas and ways to enjoy them. I have a cupboard full and I’m always ready to try a flavor that is unfamiliar. If I’m reading something that requires some concentration, I’ll go with either a nettle tea (yes, stinging nettle) or Turkey Tail Astragalus made with the Turkey Tail mushroom and the root of astragalus. It’s thick enough to be a robust coffee but without the caffeine. Just right, for focusing in the evening.

If the day is stressful, chamomile cannot be beaten. It is a weaker tea, but with a longer steep time it is delicious. A lovely cup of green tea after lunch hits the spot to continue a work day.

The library has a few titles with some nummy tea recipes: The Healing Herbs by Michael Castleman, The Folk Remedy Encyclopedia by the Editors of FC&A Medical Publishing and our newest, Vibrant by Dr. Stacie Stephenson.

cloud-tea-monkeysThe history of tea includes like Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet. One of my favorite stories. I read it many times. It tells of a little girl who tries to harvest tea leaves in her mother’s place when she became sick. She was too tiny to do it, but the monkeys helped. Oops, already told you too much but the story gets even better from there.

Teas are intertwined with communities in many parts of the world. Sharing a cup with family or in a special ceremony is part of tradition and a memory-making event. Tea has had great value throughout history in the social aspect and the economic world. Remember the Boston Tea Party? It was an initial act of defiance by American colonists.

Traditionally, oolong is drunk with someone who you want to share an extended period of time. You steep it for only a minute and then enjoy. Steep the same leaves for a minute and a half, pour the second cup and visit a little more. Again the same leaves are steeped for 2 minutes while visiting with your dear friend.

Kids enjoy tea, too or at least the tea party. There are many children’s books where tea is central to the story. Even a song, remember I’m a Little Teapot? We have a book with that same name by Iza Trapani. While you’re looking for good tea books in the Easy Section, be sure to check out Tea with Grandpa by Barney Saltzberg.

I do believe it’s time for me to fill my cup again.