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'picture books'

Sep 03

Do You Remember the Lyrics? by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 3, 2021 at 2:25 PM by Genesis Gaule

Are you singing the right lyrics to the songs you learned as a kid? I love to hear children sing. If the words aren’t quite the ones I remember, that doesn’t matter. They sing with their hearts and I can hum along, but do I remember the lyrics?

For the life of me, I cannot remember the lyrics to Somewhere Over the Rainbow. I obviously made up some words as a kid and that is how I remember it. Though sometimes, my curiosity (or the funny looks of my grandchildren) will cause me to find the original lyrics to some of my favorites.

home on the rangeThe Library can come to the rescue for lots of those songs especially in the Easy section. We can find Home On the Range edited by Barbie H. Schwaeber. It is based on a poem written by a Kansas homesteader, Dr. Brewster M. Higley. Others have tried to take credit for it and have tried to change the words. Ranchers, farmers and cowboys adopted the song as an unofficial anthem for the American West. Kansas adopted it as their state song. But how did it get to be so well known?

The story behind a song can be a lot of fun. Another book by the same title, Home On the Range: John A. Lomax and His Cowboy Songs by Deborah Hopkinson tells how as a young man, John went out with an old-fashioned recording device in the early 1900s to capture songs that were sung by cowboys. Then he wrote them down for us. He went out again later in life and captured more songs. Many of his recordings of singing cowboys are stored at the Library of Congress. I bet those cowboys would be surprised to know their voices live on in such a prestigious place!

take me out to ball gameTake Me Out to the Ball Game by Jack Norworth is another unofficial anthem. Baseball games would not be the same without this song even though we only sing one of the three verses. How many of us know the words to the other two?

To help us remember songs from our youth, the Library has a wonderful selection of DVDs called Sentimental Sing-Alongs. Their topics range from patriotic to romance and from locations all over the country.

We do grow up and discover new songs and with them singers who become favorites. Some write their own music and others have lyricists that create the words for them. There are those who redo an old classic with their own personality by changing up the music, but the lyrics live on.

Lyrics catch attention so they’re often used as titles like in these books owned by the library:

Aug 27

How to Get the Most Out of Your Read Aloud Time by Andrea Lorenz

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on August 27, 2021 at 9:21 AM by Genesis Gaule

Research shows that one of the best things you can do to prepare your children for school and later success is to read aloud to them. Even just 15 minutes a day is enough to make a big difference. Here are some tips to help you get the most out of your read aloud time.

1) Book Choice 

When you’re looking for your next bedtime book, look for something that will interest your child. You can choose books related to their special interests, like tractors or spiders, or you could choose books that relate to experiences your child has had lately, like losing a tooth or visiting the zoo. Whatever it is, find something your child will be into and at an appropriate reading level. (Need help choosing? Any of our librarians would be happy to help!)

2) Pre-Read

Take a look through the book before you start your read aloud. This can help you identify jokes, figure out what kind of voices you want to do, and familiarize you with the plot and the text.

3) Use Some Expression

You don’t have to have an EGOT* to be a good reader. Your child will love reading time because they love spending time with you! But a little vocal expression never hurt anyone. Find places to slow down and speed up, get louder or softer. You can even try out some voices! (I personally love making teeny tiny squeaky mouse voices.)

4) Point Out Words and Letters

As you read, follow the text with your finger. Point out specific words that you see, or specific letters that your child might be familiar with. This helps children to understand that you’re reading the words and not the pictures! You can talk about what new words mean and point out when words are BIGGER than others and what that might mean.

5) Ask Questions

You can make read alouds more engaging by asking your child questions as you read. These can be as simple as “What do you think will happen next?” or a little more complex like “What would you do in that situation?” Gear your questions toward your child’s comprehension level (for example, you might ask a three year old “What’s that?” and point to a picture on the page, but you’d probably ask a six year old “What does this remind you of in your own life?”)

6) Have Fun!

Reading time should be fun. Make silly faces and laugh. Don’t finish books you don’t like. Choose another one instead. Above all, enjoy the time you have together.

Some of Miss Andrea's favorite read aloud books:

read-alouds cover collage

Preschool:

Elementary School: 

Chapter Books (Elementary and up):

*EGOT: Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony awards (People who have received all four awards are said to have an EGOT and include Rita Moreno, Audrey Hepburn, Mel Brooks, and more)

Aug 19

First Day of School Jitters by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on August 19, 2021 at 6:08 PM by Genesis Gaule

Is your child excited for the new school year or dreading it? Maybe even a bit of both! Starting school is a big milestone and can be filled with overwhelming emotions, especially for young children. Whether they are starting school for the first time or moving up a grade, reading with your child about school can help them process these big feelings and prepare them for what school might be like.

Not sure where to start? Here are 10 picture books to help your child start their school year off on the right foot!

Llama Llama Misses Mama

by Anna Dewdney

It's Llama Llama's first day of preschool! But after mama leaves, Llama Llama is sad. Can the other children and his teacher help him enjoy school even though he misses his mama? A classic selection for kids who experience separation anxiety. // Ages 3-5 (PreS-K)


The Pigeon has to go to School!

by Mo Willems

Pigeon does not want to go to school and he’s going to tell you why. What if math is too hard? The backpack will be too heavy! Will the other kids like him? Humor is a wonderful way to ease the first-day-of-school jitters, and this silly, relatable story captures many common school anxieties. It's also a great way to help kids open up about their own fears of starting school. // Ages 3-6 (PreS-1)


Vera's First Day of School

by Vera Rosenberry

The first day of school can be both thrilling and scary. Vera cannot wait for the day when she starts school, but the first day does not go exactly as she has planned. With charm and gentle humor, Vera explores all the different feelings associated with this important milestone. // Ages 4-6 (PreS-1)


The King of Kindergarten

by Derrick Barnes

Inspire confidence in your little one with this upbeat story following a young boy as he conquers his first day of kindergarten with courage and kindness. // Ages 4-5 (K)


First Day Critter Jitters

by Jory John

It's almost the first day of school, and the animals are nervous, each with their own worries about how school will go. Can the animals learn to help one another through their jitters to make sure school isn't so scary after all? // Ages 4-8 (K-3)


I Got the School Spirit

by Connie Schofield-Morrison

Send your kid off to school eager and bursting with optimism as a young girl enthusiastically spreads school spirit from home to school and back again. Each lively illustrated spread features a simple sentence with an accompanying sound effect that makes reading aloud especially fun. // Ages 4-6 (PreS-1)


The New Kid Has Fleas

by Ame Dyckman

The new girl is... weird. She doesn’t wear shoes, howls, and kids say she even has fleas! Follow the narrator as he learns about getting to know someone different than himself when he is paired with the new kid during a science project. // Ages 4-7 (K-2)


Unicorn Is Maybe Not So Great After All

by Bob Shea

Concerned about losing friends during the first week of school, Unicorn upgrades his fabulousness. But when his plan backfires, Unicorn learns about who real friends are and the importance of being true to oneself. // Ages 4-8 (K-3)


Your Name Is a Song

by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow

Saddened by her classmates' and teacher's mispronunciations of her name, Kora-Jalimuso is empowered as she and her mom celebrate the musicality of African, Asian, Black-American, Latine, and Middle Eastern names. A beautiful and heartwarming story about honoring identity and cultural heritage. Pronunciations included to help the reader "sing" each name aloud. // Ages 5-10 (K-4)


The Day You Begin

by Jacqueline Woodson

This touching read acknowledges the times when children feel different or misunderstood and encourages them to share their stories, so the world can "open itself up a little wider to make some space" for them. // Available in English and en Español // Ages 5-10 (K-4)