Blog module icon

Displaying all posts tagged with:

'music'

Nov 22

Book Notes 11/22/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on November 22, 2021 at 10:13 AM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

11/22/2021


Campbell Book Club is next week. Join us to discuss This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger on Tuesday, November 30 at 6 pm. More information


Renegades by Bruce Springsteen and Barack Obama

Born in the USA: Dreams, Music, Myth // Two longtime friends share an intimate and urgent conversation about life, music, and their enduring love of America, with all its challenges and contradictions, in this stunningly produced expansion of their groundbreaking Higher Ground podcast, featuring more than 350 photographs, exclusive bonus content, and never-before-seen archival material.

973.932 SPRINGSTEEN // Also in e-book


Going There by Katie Couric

And Other Things My Daughters Taught Me // In this memoir, the iconic media star discusses her professional and personal life, including losing her husband at a young age, her historic turn as anchor of the CBS Evening News, and experiences dealing with gender inequality.

791.4502 COURIC


Brothers on Three by Abe Streep

A true story of family, resistance, and hope on a reservation in Montana // This is not simply a story about high school basketball, about state championships and a winning team. It is a book about community, and it is about boys on the cusp of adulthood, finding their way through the intersecting worlds they inhabit and forging their own paths to personhood.

306.8509 STREEP


Conquering the Pacific by Andrés Reséndez

An Unknown Mariner and the Final Great Voyage of the Age of Discovery // The story of an uncovered voyage as colorful and momentous as any on record for the Age of Discovery-and of the Black mariner whose stunning accomplishment has been until now lost to history.

959.9 RESENDEZ


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

Sep 03

Do You Remember the Lyrics? by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 3, 2021 at 2:25 PM by Genesis Gaule

Are you singing the right lyrics to the songs you learned as a kid? I love to hear children sing. If the words aren’t quite the ones I remember, that doesn’t matter. They sing with their hearts and I can hum along, but do I remember the lyrics?

For the life of me, I cannot remember the lyrics to Somewhere Over the Rainbow. I obviously made up some words as a kid and that is how I remember it. Though sometimes, my curiosity (or the funny looks of my grandchildren) will cause me to find the original lyrics to some of my favorites.

home on the rangeThe Library can come to the rescue for lots of those songs especially in the Easy section. We can find Home On the Range edited by Barbie H. Schwaeber. It is based on a poem written by a Kansas homesteader, Dr. Brewster M. Higley. Others have tried to take credit for it and have tried to change the words. Ranchers, farmers and cowboys adopted the song as an unofficial anthem for the American West. Kansas adopted it as their state song. But how did it get to be so well known?

The story behind a song can be a lot of fun. Another book by the same title, Home On the Range: John A. Lomax and His Cowboy Songs by Deborah Hopkinson tells how as a young man, John went out with an old-fashioned recording device in the early 1900s to capture songs that were sung by cowboys. Then he wrote them down for us. He went out again later in life and captured more songs. Many of his recordings of singing cowboys are stored at the Library of Congress. I bet those cowboys would be surprised to know their voices live on in such a prestigious place!

take me out to ball gameTake Me Out to the Ball Game by Jack Norworth is another unofficial anthem. Baseball games would not be the same without this song even though we only sing one of the three verses. How many of us know the words to the other two?

To help us remember songs from our youth, the Library has a wonderful selection of DVDs called Sentimental Sing-Alongs. Their topics range from patriotic to romance and from locations all over the country.

We do grow up and discover new songs and with them singers who become favorites. Some write their own music and others have lyricists that create the words for them. There are those who redo an old classic with their own personality by changing up the music, but the lyrics live on.

Lyrics catch attention so they’re often used as titles like in these books owned by the library:

Feb 19

Can You Hear the Music Playing? by Cody Rasmussen

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on February 19, 2021 at 2:09 PM by Genesis Gaule

photograph of a pair of apple ear buds laying on top of classical sheet music

Music. If there is a single thing that has maintained itself throughout the ages, it is music. Humans have been keen on the creation of music since prehistoric times. Before the creation of musical instruments, the greatest instrument a person could have was their own voice. From singing around the fire to various ceremonies, it was a part of human culture and it has only expanded since then. Singing is a part of modern life, where you can hear it coming from the smallest child to the oldest adult. As long as they are able to take a breath, you will hear voices in the air. Even though some may be off key.

backlit photo of man singing on a stage surrounded by blue light with cheering fans below

Music can be found in various forms now, from the vocals to the various instruments that are used to play the music. Flutes and trumpets, pianos and guitars, even various parts of the body apart from the vocal cords have become musical instruments. From soothing classical to the blaring of heavy metal, music shapes to each person’s own desires. Music is an idea that connects the entire world together. If we continue to create music, we will continue to show who we are as humans.

photo of a tambourine, snare drum with drumsticks, a guitar, and electric keyboard shot from above

“And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music.”
- Friedrich Nietzsche

Browse our catalog for books about: