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'memoir'

Oct 04

Book Notes 10/4/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on October 4, 2021 at 11:36 AM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

10/4/2021


Stretch your creative muscles! Pick up a Japanese Cord Braiding kit starting Monday, October 11 then join us on Zoom Tuesday, October 19 @ 6pm to put it all together. More information


I Live a Life Like Yours by Jan Grue

A Memoir // Grue was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy at the age of three. Shifting between specific periods of his life-- his youth with his parents and sister in Norway; his years of study in Berkeley, St. Petersburg, and Amsterdam; and his current life as a professor, husband, and father. He intersperses these histories with elegant, astonishingly wise reflections on the world, social structures, disability, loss, relationships, and the body: In short, on what it means to be human.

362.4 GRUE


A Cowboy of Legend by Linda Broday

Lone Star Legends Series, Book 1 // Deacon Brannock is determined to make a name for himself as a rancher but, the saloon he won in a poker game is taking all his time and energy. He was prepared for life in the Wild West, but he hadn't counted on Grace Legend... Grace has always fought hard for what she believes in, that includes keeping alcohol out of her town. When the new owner of a saloon in town turns out to be a kind and considerate man, she can't help but wonder if they could have a future together... if they weren't on opposite sides of every issue.

Large Print BRODAY


And Then The Gray Heaven by RE Katz

zion-unmatched

Confronting the red tape of the hospital, the dissociation and cruelty of B's family, and the unimaginable void now at the center of their lives, Jules and new friend Theo embark on a road trip to bury two-thirds of B's ashes in the places they most belong. Along the way, Katz delves into their relationship and their life stories--Jules' rise from abandoned baby origins through the Florida foster care system, and B's artistic transformation, surrounded by kindred spirits who helped them realize it was possible to be regarded as a human and not as a body.

KATZ


Find Me by Anne Frasier

Convicted serial killer Benjamin Fisher has offered to lead San Bernardino detective Daniel Ellis to the isolated graves of his victims. One catch: He'll only do it if FBI profiler Reni Fisher, his estranged daughter, accompanies them. She still feels complicit in her father's crimes--Reni was the bait to lure unsuspecting women to their deaths. Ellis shares her obsession with the past and is convinced that his mother was one of Fisher's victims. As thirty years of bad memories flood back, it's only the beginning of a nightmare.

Mystery FRASIER


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

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Sep 27

Book Notes 9/27/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 27, 2021 at 3:10 PM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

9/27/2021


Virtual Storytime and Virtual Baby Bounce with Miss Andrea are back! Tune in each week for a new story on our website or YouTube page. Watch Now


Made in China by Anna Qu

A Memoir of Love and Labor // Traveling from Wenzhou to Xi'an to New York, Made in China is a fierce memoir unafraid to ask thorny questions about trauma and survival in immigrant families, the meaning of work, and the costs of immigration.

973.04951 QU


The Kaepernick Effect by Dave Zirin

Taking a Knee, Changing the World // A veteran sportswriter interviews high school athletes, college athletes, pro athletes and others involved in the nationwide movement to "take a knee" in response to police brutality.

796.09 ZIRIN


The Sum of Us by Jean Hanff Korelitz

zion-unmatched

What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together // Heather McGhee's specialty is the American economy--and the mystery of why it so often fails the American public. From the 2008 financial crisis to rising student debt to collapsing public infrastructure, she found a common root problem: racism. But not just in the most obvious indignities for people of color. Racism has costs for white people, too. It is the common denominator of our most vexing public problems, the core dysfunction of our democracy and constitutive of the spiritual and moral crisis that grip us all. But how did this happen? And is there a way out? McGhee embarks on a deeply personal journey across the country from Maine to Mississippi to California, tallying what we lose when we buy into the zero-sum paradigm--the idea that progress for some of us must come at the expense of others.

305.8 MCGHEE


The Heroine with 1,001 Faces by Maria Tartar

For decades, Joseph Campbell had defined our cultural aspirations in The Hero with a Thousand Faces, emphasizing the value of seeking glory and earning immortality. His work became the playbook for Hollywood, with its many male-centric quest narratives. Challenging the models in Campbell's canonical work, Maria Tatar explores how heroines, rarely wielding a sword and deprived of a pen, have flown beneath the radar even as they have been bent on social missions. Using the domestic arts and storytelling skills, they have displayed audacity, curiosity, and care as they struggled to survive and change the reigning culture. Animating figures from Ovid's Philomela, her tongue severed yet still weaving a tale about sexual assault, to Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander, a high-tech wizard seeking justice for victims of a serial killer, The Heroine with 1,001 Faces creates a luminous arc that takes us from ancient times to the present.

398.082 TATAR


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

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Sep 14

Book Notes 9/13/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 14, 2021 at 6:40 PM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

9/13/2021


Our September Book Club pick is The Midnight Library by Matt Haig. Check it out and then join us on September 28 at 6 pm to discuss.


The Case of the Murderous Dr. Cream by Dean Jobb

The Hunt for a Victorian Era Serial Killer // Dr. Thomas Neil Cream used poison on vulnerable and desperate women, many who had turned to him for medical help. Framed around one salacious trial in 1891 London, Jobb explores a fascinating and vividly told true-crime narrative about the hunt for one of the first known serial killers, whose poisoning spree in the US, Canada, and England coincided with the birth of forensic science as well as the public's growing appetite for crime fiction such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes novels.

364.152 JOBB


How the Word is Passed by Clint Smith

A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America // 'How the Word is Passed' is Clint Smith's revealing, contemporary portrait of America as a slave owning nation. Beginning in his own hometown of New Orleans, Smith leads the reader through an unforgettable tour of monuments and landmarks - those that are honest about the past and those that are not - that offer an intergenerational story of how slavery has been central in shaping our nations collective history, and ourselves.

306.362 SMITH


The Almost Legendary Morris Sisters by Julie Klam

zion-unmatched

A True Story of Family Fiction // A the revealing account of what Klam discovered about her family - and herself - as she dug into the past. The deeper she went into the lives of the Morris sisters, the slipperier their stories became. And the more questions she had about what actually happened to them, the more her opinion of them evolved. Part memoir and part confessional and told with the wit and honesty that are hallmarks of Klam's books, The Almost Legendary Morris Sisters is the fascinating and funny true story of one writer's journey into her family's past, the truths she brings to light, and what she learned about herself along the way.

974.71043 KLAM


Elizabeth & Margaret by Andrew Morton

The Intimate World of the Windsor Sisters // They were the closest of sisters and the best of friends. But when, in a quixotic twist of fate, their uncle Edward Vlll decided to abdicate the throne, the dynamic between Elizabeth and Margaret was dramatically altered. Forever more Margaret would have to curtsey to the sister she called 'Lillibet.' And bow to her wishes. Elizabeth would always look upon her younger sister's antics with a kind of stoical amusement, but Margaret's struggle to find a place and position inside the royal system--and her fraught relationship with its expectations--was often a source of tension. Famously, the Queen had to inform Margaret that the Church and government would not countenance her marrying a divorcee, Group Captain Peter Townsend, forcing Margaret to choose between keeping her title and royal allowances or her divorcee lover. From the idyll of their cloistered early life, through their hidden war-time lives, into the divergent paths they took following their father's death and Elizabeth's ascension to the throne, this book explores their relationship over the years. Andrew Morton's latest biography offers unique insight into these two drastically different sisters--one resigned to duty and responsibility, the other resistant to it--and the lasting impact they have had on the Crown, the royal family, and the ways it adapted to the changing mores of the 20th century.

941.085092 LP MORTON


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive