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Aug 31

Book Notes 8/30/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on August 31, 2021 at 10:46 AM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

8/30/2021


September is Library Card Sign-Up Month. Library cards are free for all East Grand Forks residents, East Grand Forks teachers and students. More information


The Joy of Sweat by Sarah Everts

The Strange Science of Perspiration // A taboo-busting romp through the shame, stink, and strange science of sweating. Sweating may be one of our weirdest biological functions, but it's also one of our most vital and least understood. In The Joy of Sweat, Sarah Everts goes behind the taboo and delves into its role in the body-and in human history. She reveals the wondrous mechanics of the sweat glands and the millions of sweat pores in human skin. She explores why sweat is salty, why what you eat can affect the color of your sweat, and why we sweat when stressed (and whether it can be controlled). She takes part in a sweat dating event, traces the controversial history of antiperspirants and deodorants, considers the purported health benefits of saunas, sweat lodges, and hammams, and investigates whether "eyewitnesses" to a crime may someday be replaced by "nose-witnesses" who can pick a suspect's body odor out of a police lineup.

612.7 EVERTS


How Iceland Changed the World by Egill Bjarnason

The Big History of a Small Island // Provides a tour of the history of Iceland, from the time a Viking captain ran aground there 1,200 years ago to the pivotal role it played during the French Revolution, the moon landing, and the foundation of Israel.

949.12 BJARNASON


The Outdoor Scientist by Temple Grandin, Ph.D.

zion-unmatched

The Wonder of Observing the Natural World // Dr. Temple Grandin introduces young readers to geologists, astrophysicists, oceanographers, and many other scientists through a series of projects to understand the world around them.

508 GRANDIN


The Quiet Zone by Stephen Kurczy

Unraveling the Mystery of a Town Suspended in Silence // Deep in the Appalachian Mountains, Green Bank, West Virginia, is a place at once futuristic and old-fashioned. It is home to the Green Bank Observatory, where astronomers search the depths of the universe using the latest technology. With a ban on all devices emanating radio frequencies that might interfere with the observatory's telescopes, residents live a life free from constant digital connectivity; schoolchildren go without WiFi or iPads. Kurcxy introduces readers to a tech buster patrolling the area for illegal radio waves; "electrosensitives" who claim that WiFi is deadly; a sheriff's department with a string of unsolved murder cases dating back decades; a camp of neo-Nazis plotting their resurgence from a nearby mountain hollow; and ordinary citizens seeking a simpler way of living. Kurczy asks: Is a less connected life desirable? Is it even possible?

975.4 KURCZY


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

May 24

Book Notes 5/24/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on May 24, 2021 at 11:52 AM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

5/21/2021


The Campbell Library is open to the public Monday/Friday (9am-5pm) and Tuesday/Thursday (10am-7pm). We also offer Front Door Pick Up and half hour appointments for browsing or computer use Wednesdays (9am-5pm).


Pappyland by Wright Thompson

A Story of Family, Fine Bourbon, and the Things That Last // The story of how Julian Van Winkle III, the caretaker of the most coveted cult Kentucky Bourbon whiskey in the world, fought to protect his family's heritage and preserve the taste of his forebears, in a world where authenticity, like his product, is in very short supply.

338.7 LP THOMPSON

Gory Details by Erika Engelhaupt

Adventures From the Dark Side of Science // Science reporter Erika Engelhaupt investigates the gross, strange, and morbid absurdities of our bodies and our universe. From the research biologist who stung himself with every conceivable insect to the world's most murderous mammals, this book explores often ignored but alluring facets of biology, anatomy, space exploration, nature, and more.

500 ENGELHAUPT 

Call of the Wild by Kimberly Ann Johnson

How We Heal Trauma, Awaken Our Own Power, and Use It For Good // In an increasingly polarized world where trauma is often publicly renegotiated, our nervous systems are on high alert. From skyrocketing rates of depression and anxiety to physical illnesses such as autoimmune diseases and digestive disorders, many women today find themselves living out of alignment with their bodies.

158.4 GILLARD

Remember by Lisa Genova

The Science of Memory and the Art of Forgetting // A fascinating exploration of the intricacies of how we remember, why we forget, and what we can do to protect our memories. You can set educated expectations for your memory, and in doing so, create a better relationship with it. You don't have to fear it anymore. And that can be life-changing.

153.1 GENOVA


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

May 07

What Does that Word Mean? by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on May 7, 2021 at 12:55 PM by Genesis Gaule

In the middle of a good read, no one wants to be disrupted by an unfamiliar word. I don’t mind a new word now and then, but too many will make me shut the book and go to the next. It’s good for my brain to add something that I can turn around and use, but again, too often and the whole read will be abandoned.

For the most part, words can be figured out by how the author uses them. If a main character wears a green jacket than any other word that refers to its color would mean some kind of green, like emerald, pastoral or verdant.

Our individual vocabulary is made up of the words each of us use. We each have four kinds of vocabulary:

  1. Reading--a word we can understand while into a book
  2. Listening--the words we understand when someone speaks
  3. Speaking--words we use when talking to someone
  4. Writing--the words we use when writing a letter, office work or homework

As I mentioned earlier, you may understand a word while reading because a good author has guided you to its meaning.

When listening to someone talking, words fly past quickly but we have the advantage of body language. If I heard ‘plummet’ for the first time and a friend demonstrated it with a hand coming down quickly, I’d understand. This may mean we understand more words than if we were reading them.

What words we choose when speaking to someone depends a great deal on who that someone is to us. If we’re looking at the weather with a 3-year-old, you might say, “It looks like it’s going to rain a lot today.” When speaking to Grandpa, you might say, “It looks like a thunderstorm.”

Our writing vocabulary can demonstrate a different range of words than when we’re speaking. Though there may be many words we use when talking that we’d never write down. Some we may never have seen in print. Kitty-corner is a word like that for me. I’d used it all my life and only recently saw it in print.

These vocabularies can be surprisingly different. Consider how you speak to your closest friends compared to how you speak to co-workers, Grandma or a flight attendant. There may be favorite words shared or some less favorable. All these vocabularies combine to make your personnel collection of words.

There are authors I read to challenge my vocabulary. I know I’ll have to take my time and focus. Other books, I fly through, knowing there will be no challenge.

doctors-blackwellIf you’d like to learn a few new words from good authors, how about trying The Doctors Black by Janice P. Nimura. The book is casual and yet a fascinating account of the first 2 female medical doctors. Nonfiction is good at teaching new words, but so is fiction. The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells is told from a robot’s point of view. I loved how its techy language was like a casual conversation about what’s for dinner. The author who always challenged me the most was Umberto Eco. If you like words, try his books.

pomegranateAn important part of learning how to read is learning new words, written and spoken. When I was young, I had no experience with pomegranates. I couldn’t have recognized one until I was an adult. A great book to share with kids is Grena and the Magic Pomegranate by Melvin Leavitt. Not only will the reader learn what a pomegranate is, but will also enjoy a great story and possibly learn a new word.