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'humor'

Aug 19

First Day of School Jitters by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on August 19, 2021 at 6:08 PM by Genesis Gaule

Is your child excited for the new school year or dreading it? Maybe even a bit of both! Starting school is a big milestone and can be filled with overwhelming emotions, especially for young children. Whether they are starting school for the first time or moving up a grade, reading with your child about school can help them process these big feelings and prepare them for what school might be like.

Not sure where to start? Here are 10 picture books to help your child start their school year off on the right foot!

Llama Llama Misses Mama

by Anna Dewdney

It's Llama Llama's first day of preschool! But after mama leaves, Llama Llama is sad. Can the other children and his teacher help him enjoy school even though he misses his mama? A classic selection for kids who experience separation anxiety. // Ages 3-5 (PreS-K)


The Pigeon has to go to School!

by Mo Willems

Pigeon does not want to go to school and he’s going to tell you why. What if math is too hard? The backpack will be too heavy! Will the other kids like him? Humor is a wonderful way to ease the first-day-of-school jitters, and this silly, relatable story captures many common school anxieties. It's also a great way to help kids open up about their own fears of starting school. // Ages 3-6 (PreS-1)


Vera's First Day of School

by Vera Rosenberry

The first day of school can be both thrilling and scary. Vera cannot wait for the day when she starts school, but the first day does not go exactly as she has planned. With charm and gentle humor, Vera explores all the different feelings associated with this important milestone. // Ages 4-6 (PreS-1)


The King of Kindergarten

by Derrick Barnes

Inspire confidence in your little one with this upbeat story following a young boy as he conquers his first day of kindergarten with courage and kindness. // Ages 4-5 (K)


First Day Critter Jitters

by Jory John

It's almost the first day of school, and the animals are nervous, each with their own worries about how school will go. Can the animals learn to help one another through their jitters to make sure school isn't so scary after all? // Ages 4-8 (K-3)


I Got the School Spirit

by Connie Schofield-Morrison

Send your kid off to school eager and bursting with optimism as a young girl enthusiastically spreads school spirit from home to school and back again. Each lively illustrated spread features a simple sentence with an accompanying sound effect that makes reading aloud especially fun. // Ages 4-6 (PreS-1)


The New Kid Has Fleas

by Ame Dyckman

The new girl is... weird. She doesn’t wear shoes, howls, and kids say she even has fleas! Follow the narrator as he learns about getting to know someone different than himself when he is paired with the new kid during a science project. // Ages 4-7 (K-2)


Unicorn Is Maybe Not So Great After All

by Bob Shea

Concerned about losing friends during the first week of school, Unicorn upgrades his fabulousness. But when his plan backfires, Unicorn learns about who real friends are and the importance of being true to oneself. // Ages 4-8 (K-3)


Your Name Is a Song

by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow

Saddened by her classmates' and teacher's mispronunciations of her name, Kora-Jalimuso is empowered as she and her mom celebrate the musicality of African, Asian, Black-American, Latine, and Middle Eastern names. A beautiful and heartwarming story about honoring identity and cultural heritage. Pronunciations included to help the reader "sing" each name aloud. // Ages 5-10 (K-4)


The Day You Begin

by Jacqueline Woodson

This touching read acknowledges the times when children feel different or misunderstood and encourages them to share their stories, so the world can "open itself up a little wider to make some space" for them. // Available in English and en Español // Ages 5-10 (K-4)

Jul 02

These Are a Few of My Favorite Tropes! by Vanesa Gomez

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on July 2, 2021 at 2:18 PM by Genesis Gaule

While some people might think of any use of tropes as something that hurts an author’s writing, they may be surprised to find that almost every story utilizes them. They can be incorporated into a story to set up a character type, be creatively used to complicate a journey, or just used for some feel good content. If you’ve ever been waiting for a love triangle to unfold, you will either want to pull your hair out in frustration or be at the edge of your seat in anticipation. Coffee shop settings with romantic tension are either your cup of joe or make you yawn. Essentially, everyone connects with and favors some tropes over others. Here are a few books that incorporate some of my favorite tropes.

Found Family:

One of my all time favorites is the “Found family/Chosen family” trope. In these stories, a group of misfits find a home in the company of others in the group. They learn to confide, trust, and protect each other on their journey to complete a mission. It's a great way to create character arcs in a work of literature, when a ton of exposition for a large ensemble may feel out of place or unnatural. Over time we can see more of a character’s personality and background come out when they encounter difficulties. It’s also a reminder to readers that your family is made up of people that care about you, not necessarily the family you were born into.

Some books that incorporate this trope well are:

The House in the Cerulean Sea

by TJ Klune

When a group of children in an orphanage have the power to destroy the world, it’s up to Linus to investigate how dangerous they really are. Along the way, he may have to choose between saving his newfound family, or the world.
Science Fiction KLUNE

Six of Crows

by Leigh Bardugo

Six dangerous outcasts. One impossible heist. Kaz's crew is the only thing that might stand between the world and destruction--if they don't kill each other first.
Junior BARDUGO

Artemis Fowl Series

by Eoin Colfer

(Slow build over the entire 8 book series) Artemis is a young boy genius with a mantra to guide him through life: “Gold is Power”. When this leads to elaborate and risky schemes to maintain his family’s wealth, those he once considered enemies will turn out to be more than he ever expected.
Junior COLFER

The Hobbit

by J.R.R Tolkien

A homebody Hobbit is reluctantly swept up into an epic journey by a wizard and thirteen dwarves.
Science Fiction TOLKIENebook

Enemies to Lovers:

When it comes to romance, “enemies to lovers” books are particularly fun to read. In these stories, people who see the worst in the other person grow to find themselves lost without them. Snarky humor and heartfelt moments of character growth? What more can you ask for!

Red,White and Royal Blue

by Leigh Bardugo

Alex Claremont-Diaz--America's Goldenboy First Son--has a beef with Prince Henry across the pond. And when the tabloids get hold of a photo involving an Alex-Henry altercation, U.S./British relations take a turn for the worse. Heads of state devise a plan for damage control: staging a truce between the two rivals. What at begins as a fake, Instragramable friendship grows deeper, and more dangerous, than either Alex or Henry could have imagined... and could possibly upend two nations.
Fiction MCQUISTON

The Unhoneymooners

by Christina Lauren

For two sworn enemies, anything can happen during the Hawaiian trip of a lifetime—maybe even love—in this romantic comedy. Olive Torres is used to being the unlucky twin: from inexplicable mishaps to a recent layoff, her life seems to be almost comically jinxed. When her eternally lucky tiwn sister Ami gets married, Olive, is forced to spend it with the best man (and her nemesis), Ethan Thomas.
Fiction MCQUISTONebook

Pride and Prejudice

by Jane Austen

At the end of eighteenth-century England, spirited Elizabeth Bennet copes with the suit of the snobbish Mr. Darcy while trying to sort out the romantic entanglements of two of her sisters, sweet and beautiful Jane and scatterbrained Lydia.
AUSTENebook

If you are curious to find out more about the patterns found in media, try looking up a book on Tropedia. You may find yourself surprised by the list of tropes a single novel contains, and even more surprised to see if there is a trend connecting all your favorite books.

Apr 23

7 Silly Picture Books to Read Aloud by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on April 23, 2021 at 4:18 PM by Genesis Gaule

One of the joys of spending time with young children is being able to read aloud with them. My daughter loves hearing us act out the voicing of the characters, feeling the rhythm of words strung together, and hearing us try to master a tricky tongue twister. She especially enjoys stories with a humorous twist--the sillier the better!

While most are familiar with the wonderful staples of Dr. Seuss and Mo Willems’ Elephant and Piggy (and Pigeon!) books, here are a few other laugh inducing selections we’ve enjoyed that just beg to be read aloud:

The Book with No Pictures
by B. J. Novak

Easy Fiction | eBook

Your youngster may think a book without pictures would be boring, but this book is anything but! That is because you must say every increasingly preposterous sentence and nonsense word printed on the page out loud. A little irreverent and irresistibly silly, this one will turn any reader into a comedian.

Read to Tiger
 by S. J. Fore; illustrated by R.W. Alley

when-you-trap-a-tiger

Easy Fiction

Do you ever get annoyed when someone keeps interrupting your precious reading time? That’s exactly what this little boy goes through, except he’s being distracted by a large playful tiger behind his couch! Get your best “tiger voice” ready for this silly and heartwarming read.

Unicorn Thinks He’s Pretty Great
by Bob Shea

Easy Fiction -- Currently a part of our Storytime kits!

Goat becomes very jealous when Unicorn moves to town. Now that everyone loves Unicorn, he feels like yesterday's news! Can the two learn to celebrate their differences or will Goat stay upset forever? Great for fans of the Pigeon books' “irritated narrator” style of humor.

The Princess and the Pony
by Kate Beaton

Easy Fiction

Princess Pinecone longs to have a horse of her own--a big, strong, warhorse--to help her compete in the battle games with the other warriors. When she finally gets one for her birthday, she doesn't quite get the horse of her dreams...

Dragons Love Tacos
by Adam Rubin; illustrated by Daniel Salmieri

when-you-trap-a-tiger

Easy Fiction

Dragons love tacos--who knew? So if you want to lure a bunch of dragons to your party, you should absolutely serve tacos. But whatever you do, don’t feed them spicy salsa! With its conversational tone and charming illustrations, this book will make you hungry and laugh.

The Gingerbread Man Loose in the School
by Laura Murray; illustrated by Mike Lowery

Easy Fiction

We fell in love with the Gingerbread Man books with his adventures at the Firehouse and were excited to find more! With its clever rhyming and wonderful rhythm, this delightful twist on the classic gingerbread man tale is definitely a fun one to read out loud.

Rapunzel and the Seven Dwarves
by Willy Claflin; illustrated by James Stimson

eAudiobook

Not so good at voices? This picture book will read itself from the Libby App! This “distremely” whimsical blend of three classic fairy tales is impeccably narrated from the perspective of Maynard Moose--complete with Bullwinkle-ish moose dialect--which only amplifies the silliness of this rambling yarn.