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'historical fiction'

Jan 04

Book Notes 1/4/21

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on January 4, 2021 at 12:27 PM by Genesis Gaule

Open books and the words book notes

1/4/2021


The Campbell Library is open to the public Mondays/Fridays (9am-5pm) and Tuesdays/Thursdays (4-7pm). We also offer Front Door Pick Up and half hour appointments for browsing or computer use Wednesdays (9am-5pm) and Tuesdays/Thursdays (9am-4pm).


Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey

McConaughey shares the story of his life, including important things he learned and wrote about in the many diaries he’s kept, with a theme throughout: if you can deal with life’s challenges, you can enjoy a state of success he calls “catching greenlights.”

Return from Siberia by Svenja O'Donnell

Democratic political consultant John Simon discovers a 100-year-old manuscript written by his grandfather—a brilliant revolutionary whose exile to Siberia by the last czar of Russia was just the beginning of his extraordinary tale.

A Blessing to Cherish by Lauraine Snelling

Red River of the North Series #7 // After several years of widowhood, Ingeborg has found contentment. But now one of her dearest friendships is changing. And meanwhile, her stepson is raising two children alone since his wife died, but there is a new schoolteacher in town whom he can’t seem to be himself around.

Cher Ami and Major Whittlesey by Kathleen Rooney

Neither Cher Ami, a messenger bird, nor Charles Whittlesey, an army officer, can anticipate how their lives will briefly intersect in a chaotic battle in the forests of France in this story inspired by true events of World War I.


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

Dec 21

Book Notes 12/21/20

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on December 21, 2020 at 10:26 AM by Genesis Gaule

Open books and the words book notes

12/21/2020


The Campbell Library is open to the public Tuesdays (9am-7pm) and Fridays (9am-5pm). We also offer Front Door Pick Up and half hour appointments for browsing or computer use Mondays and Wednesdays (9am-5pm), and Thursdays (9am-7pm).


Knockout by Mia Kang

knockout-kang

Kang is many things—a sought-after model, an immigrant, an eating disorder survivor, a Muay Thai fighter—and she tells about her journey from self-loathing to self-love.

Notes on a Silencing by Lacy Crawford

When an elite school comes under investigation for reports of sexual abuse and victims are asked to come forward, Crawford sends in a note. Assaulted when she was 15, the adults and school buried her story to save their reputation. Now Crawford investigates the ways of gender, privilege, and power.

To Tell You the Truth by Gilly Macmillan

When Lucy’s needy, jealous husband disappears, she can’t hide behind the fiction that she writes any longer. Because this isn’t the first time someone has disappeared from her life, and now she is under intense scrutiny.

Mountain Laurel by Lori Benton

North Carolina, 1783: Ian Cameron is hoping to be his planter uncle’s heir, no matter how uneasily the role of slave owner rests upon his shoulders. Then he meets Seona—beautiful, artistic, and enslaved to his kin, who’s been drawing for years in secret.


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

Sep 25

But is the movie really better? by Michelle Flaws

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 25, 2020 at 1:34 PM by Genesis Gaule

Recently I found myself scrolling through all of the newest book adaptations available on Netflix. Young adult novels are really having a moment--which got me thinking about some of my favorites. Some readers may argue with some of my choices but polling my coworkers on their picks was entertaining because we all appreciate different genres and their adaptations

So what movies made it onto the good list?

What about the bad?

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne was filmed in 1995 with Gary Oldman and Demi Moore, in one word: embarrassing. The adaptation miserably failed to portray the suspense and restraint behind this forbidden love story. Eragon by Christopher Paolini hit the big screen in 2006 and despite having seasoned actors and a well established production company, it left the fans much to desire. The costumes, the special effects and the dialogue did not match the thrill we felt when reading the novel for the first time.

The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells received a second screen adaptation in 1996 with Marlon Brando, Val Kilmer and David Thewlis playing titular characters. Filming and production on this movie was notorious for setbacks and crew disagreements; did the heat from filming on location render them unproductive? The movie lacks the ability to demonstrate the horror that is a man toying with nature to create hybrid creatures. While the story is supposed to be disturbing, this remake leaves much to be desired. Every time I think of Marlon Brando wearing white face paint and a giant kaftan I face-palm.

What about those adaptations that have inconsistencies with its novel counterpart but are still worth seeing in the movie theatre?

Here are some recommendations:

Watch them and compare! Decide for yourself and become a fan of the book and the movie!