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'food'

Sep 20

Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month! by Vanesa Gomez

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 20, 2021 at 9:47 AM by Genesis Gaule

The changing of the seasons brings cooler weather and paints the landscape in vivid colors. As we get back into the swing of our fall routines and don our sweaters, let’s take time to celebrate Hispanic Heritage! National Hispanic Heritage Month begins September 15 and reminds us to celebrate rich culture, history, delicious food, as well as bring awareness to the struggles Hispanic communities face.

As with many other “national” months such as Black history month and Pride month, one of my favorite things to do is to read books written by authors on their experiences. Both nonfiction and fiction are great looks into others experiences or see yourself reflected. The joy I feel when reading children’s picture books that feature Hispanic representation is unmatched, knowing that my younger family members will learn to love their Hispanic heritage. Below are some books from our collection written by and about Hispanic people!


Easy Fiction

These picture books feature bilingual and/or Hispanic main characters, and they are a great way to learn some Spanish vocabulary!


Song of Frutas

by Margarita Engle and Sara Palacios

While visiting her abuelo in Cuba, a young girl helps him sell frutas, singing the name of each fruit as they walk, and after she returns to the United States, they exchange letters made of abrazos--hugs. Includes historical and cultural notes.


Paletero Man

by Lucky Diaz and Micah Player

Follow along with our narrator as he passes through his busy neighborhood in search of the Paletero Man. But when he finally catches up with him, our narrator's pockets are empty. Oh no! What happened to his dinero? It will take the help of the entire community to get the tasty treat now!


Junior Fiction


Esperanza Rising

by Pam Munoz Ryan

Esperanza and her mother are forced to leave their life of wealth and privilege in Mexico to go work in the labor camps of Southern California, where they must adapt to the harsh circumstances facing Mexican farm workers on the eve of the Great Depression. // Also available en Español


Miles Morales: Shock Waves

by Justin A. Reynolds

Miles Morales is a normal kid who happens to juggle school at Brooklyn Visions Academy while swinging through the streets of Brooklyn as Spider-Man. After a disastrous earthquake strikes his mother's birthplace of Puerto Rico, Miles springs into action to help set up a fundraiser for the devastated island. But when a new student's father goes missing, Miles begins to make connections between the disappearance and a giant corporation sponsoring Miles' fundraiser.


Nonfiction


Without a Country: The Untold Story of America's Deported Veterans

by J. Malcolm Garcia

In this book, J. Malcolm Garcia reports from across the country and abroad, profiling veterans who have been deported, as well as the families and friends they have left behind. Without a Country analyzes the political and cultural climate that has led America here and takes a hard look at the toll deportation has taken on veterans and their communities.


Spirit Run: a 6,000 Mile Marathon Through North America’s Stolen Land

by Noé Álvarez

Álvarez writes not only of overcoming hunger, thirst, and fear--dangers included stone-throwing motorists and a mountain lion--but also of asserting Indigenous and working-class humanity in a capitalist society where oil extraction, deforestation, and substance abuse wreck communities. Running through mountains, deserts, and cities, and through the Mexican territory his parents left behind, Álvarez forges a new relationship with the land, and with the act of running, carrying with him the knowledge of his parents' migration, and--against all odds in a society that exploits his body and rejects his spirit--the dream of a liberated future.


Trejo: My Life of Crime, Redemption, and Hollywood

by Danny Trejo

For the first time, the full, fascinating, and inspirational true story of Danny Trejo's journey from crime, prison, addiction, and loss to unexpected fame as Hollywood's favorite bad guy with a heart of gold..


Interested in more ways to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month? Support Hispanic creators by listening to Spanish speaking artists, appreciating art, enjoying authentic food prepared by local restaurants, and buying from small businesses!

May 24

Book Notes 5/24/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on May 24, 2021 at 11:52 AM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

5/21/2021


The Campbell Library is open to the public Monday/Friday (9am-5pm) and Tuesday/Thursday (10am-7pm). We also offer Front Door Pick Up and half hour appointments for browsing or computer use Wednesdays (9am-5pm).


Pappyland by Wright Thompson

A Story of Family, Fine Bourbon, and the Things That Last // The story of how Julian Van Winkle III, the caretaker of the most coveted cult Kentucky Bourbon whiskey in the world, fought to protect his family's heritage and preserve the taste of his forebears, in a world where authenticity, like his product, is in very short supply.

338.7 LP THOMPSON

Gory Details by Erika Engelhaupt

Adventures From the Dark Side of Science // Science reporter Erika Engelhaupt investigates the gross, strange, and morbid absurdities of our bodies and our universe. From the research biologist who stung himself with every conceivable insect to the world's most murderous mammals, this book explores often ignored but alluring facets of biology, anatomy, space exploration, nature, and more.

500 ENGELHAUPT 

Call of the Wild by Kimberly Ann Johnson

How We Heal Trauma, Awaken Our Own Power, and Use It For Good // In an increasingly polarized world where trauma is often publicly renegotiated, our nervous systems are on high alert. From skyrocketing rates of depression and anxiety to physical illnesses such as autoimmune diseases and digestive disorders, many women today find themselves living out of alignment with their bodies.

158.4 GILLARD

Remember by Lisa Genova

The Science of Memory and the Art of Forgetting // A fascinating exploration of the intricacies of how we remember, why we forget, and what we can do to protect our memories. You can set educated expectations for your memory, and in doing so, create a better relationship with it. You don't have to fear it anymore. And that can be life-changing.

153.1 GENOVA


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

Feb 05

Seconds, Please! by Andrea Lorenz

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on February 5, 2021 at 12:56 PM by Genesis Gaule

I may not be a foodie, but I’m definitely an eater. In honor of our Winter Cooking Challenge (and because I happen to particularly enjoy a book that features descriptions of mouthwatering food), here are some titles from our collection that will make your stomach rumble.

Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel

Tita has a gift for food. Her cooking is divine, so finely prepared that a single bite moves the eater to great emotion. Though Tita has fallen in love, tradition dictates that the youngest daughter, Tita, remain at home to take care of her mother. To add insult to injury, Tita’s mother arranges for Tita’s older sister to marry the man Tita loves AND asks Tita to make the wedding cake. The bitter tears Tita weeps as she whips the cake batter give the wedding guests a remarkable reaction, proving that there’s more to Tita’s gift than meets the eye.

Each chapter is prefaced by one of Tita’s hand created recipes.

Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

when-you-trap-a-tiger

While Crazy Rich Asians focuses more on the topsy turvy relationship of Rachel Chu and secret billionaire Nicholas Young than cooking, it has some mouth-watering descriptions of food:

“As Rachel tasked the char kuay teow, her eyes widened in delight at the rice noodles flash-fried with seafood, egg, and bean sprouts in a dark soy sauce….Then it was time for the satay. Rachel bit into the succulent grilled chicken, savoring its smoky sweetness carefully.”

YUM.

Kitchens of the Great Midwest by J. Ryan Stradal

Kitchens of the Great Midwest is bursting with food. The opening scene details the preparation of lutefisk, and then moves on to braised pork shoulder, chocolate habaneros, heirloom tomatoes and more. There are recipes peppered throughout the book too – Kraft caramel bars and chile oil being two examples. As this is set mainly in Minnesota, reading it is a nostalgic trip for your tastebuds.

The book follows Eva Thorvald, daughter of a Midwestern chef, blessed with a once-in-a-generation palate, as she becomes the mysterious chef behind the most sought-after dinner reservation in the country.

Rutabaga, the Adventure Chef by Eric Colossal

While Rutabaga is firmly in the genre of fantasy, it doesn’t make its recipes any less appealing.

Rutabaga, having grown bored of the standard food offerings available in his home town, travels the land searching for strange and magical ingredients to add to his cookbook. Rutabaga’s mouth-watering creations include a Perfect Pep Potion, Stuffed Koraknis Spinwheels with Sliced Pyka’s Palm, and a recipe especially created for those of us who don’t have access to magical ingredients: Chocolate-Dipped Dragon Claws. (The claws are bananas, guys).