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'fiction'

Mar 23

2022 ALA Award Winners by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on March 23, 2022 at 11:53 AM by Genesis Gaule

The American Library Association (ALA) recently announced their 2022 Youth Media Awards which honors books, videos, and other outstanding materials for children and teens. Here are this year's winners and honorees we have in our catalog!

Looking for past award winners? Check out our post about the 2021 ALA Award Winners.


watercress

Watercress

by Andrea Wang, illustrated by Jason Chin

Simple text and beautiful illustrations pack a strong emotional punch in this autobiographical picture book about gathering wild watercress that brings a daughter of immigrants closer to her family's Chinese heritage. An author's note in the back shares Andrea's childhood experience with her parents. // Easy // Ages 4 - 8

Check out these children's cultural picks:

nicky vera


fox at night

Fox at Night

by written and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor

Fox overcomes his fear of monsters when he meets real nocturnal animals. With repeating text bolstered by whimsical illustrations that provide cues to the story’s humorous plot, Tabor deftly uses sensory stimuli of sight, sound and smell to immerse young readers into the perils of the night. // Easy Reader Yellow // Ages 4 - 8

More award winning kids books:

beak ally

  • Beak & Ally #1: Unlikely Friends written and illustrated by Norm Feuti
    Theodor Seuss Geisel Award (2022 Honor) // Junior Graphic Novel // Ages 6 - 10 years
  • Mel Fell written and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor
    Caldecott Medal (2022 Honor) // Easy // Ages 4 - 8 
  • Wonder Walkers written and by Micha Archer
    Caldecott Medal (2022 Honor) // Easy // Ages 3 - 7

firekeepers

Firekeeper's Daughter

by Angeline Boulley
[Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians]

When University of Michigan student Daunis witnesses a shocking murder, she reluctantly agrees to go undercover, drawing on her knowledge of chemistry and Ojibwe traditional medicine to track down the source of a new drug. It's a page-turning YA thriller with gorgeous insight into Anishinaabe culture and a healthy dose of romance thrown in. // Junior (also in e-book and e-audiobook) // Ages 14+

More Native American award winners:


telegraph club

Last Night at the Telegraph Club

by Malinda Lo

America in 1954 is not a safe place for two girls to fall in love, especially not in Chinatown. Red-Scare paranoia threatens everyone, including Chinese Americans like Lily. With deportation looming over her father—despite his hard-won citizenship—Lily and Kath risk everything to let their love see the light of day. // Junior // Ages 14+

More award winning books for teens:

  • We Are Not Free by Traci Chee
    Asian/Pacific American Award for Youth Literature (2022 Honor) // Michael L. Printz Award (2021 Honor) // Junior // Ages 12+
  • Temple Alley Summer written by Sachiko Kashiwaba, illustrated by Miho Satake, translated by Avery Fischer Udagawa
    Mildred L. Batchelder Award (2022 Winner) // Junior // Ages 8 - 13
  • Me (Moth) by Amber McBride
    John Steptoe New Talent Award (2022 Winner) // William C. Morris Award (2022 Honor) //  ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults (2022 Top 10) // Junior // Ages 14+
  • Ace of Spades by Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé
    William C. Morris Award (2022 Honor) // Junior (also in e-audiobook) // Ages 14+
  • Starfish by Lisa Fipps
    Michael L. Printz Award (2022 Honor) // Junior // Ages 10+
  • Concrete Rose by Angie Thomas
    Michael L. Printz Award (2022 Honor) // ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults (2022 Top 10) // Junior (also in e-book) // Ages 14+
  • Light from Uncommon Stars by Ryka Aoki
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences // Science Fiction
  • The Witch’s Heart by Genevieve Gornichec
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Science Fiction
  • Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwel
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Science Fiction
  • The Rose Code by Kate Quinn
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Fiction (also in e-book)
  • Lore Olympus, Vol. 1 by Rachel Smythe
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Graphic Novel
Mar 17

Get to Know Each Other by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on March 17, 2022 at 3:16 PM by Genesis Gaule

Curiosity is probably my strongest characteristic. It shows up most strongly when I meet new people. Sometimes, I meet them in person at the library or when I’m traveling. Even more often, I meet new people in books.

There is never the awkward stumbling through an initial conversation. No wondering if I’m saying something offensive or confusing while reading. The author introduces me to someone new and away I go into finding out all about them.

warriorsMy curiosity leads me to ask questions, even when reading. “Why would he do that?,” will send me back through the pages to catch what I must have missed. Fictional characters’ actions are often well explained in a book. Then there are the historical books which sometimes give one view of a moment in our past. I especially enjoy histories of groups of people like Warriors in Uniform: the Legacy of American Indian Heroism by Herman Viola. It had personal stories and the history that put their stories into context. I enjoyed a lot of the pictures also.

Memoirs are a real person’s retelling of an event or life experience through an emotional lens. Will I learn about the person? Absolutely. Some personal stories are told through important messages they want to share as in Every Body Yoga by Jessamyn Stanley.

How many times have you asked a question like “Is Sam your oldest brother or cousin?” That’s done when in the presence of another person. No matter how many times we visit with that individual, we can’t keep those details straight. A good amount of credit needs to go to people who can remember all the details about a person they meet like Sherlock Holmes does or Detective Vale in The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman. Yes, that one’s fiction but I’m connected to all the characters. I also ask why about actions or viewpoints and sometimes get answers from living and breathing people though this can be much easier in a book. When searching for an answer in a book, there is no consequence for rereading a page to find the answer like there might be by asking, “What’s your name again?”.

noorAnother way to get to know people who I can’t find in our community is to read their folklore or stories based on them. The Jasmine Throne by Tasha Suri includes the epics of India as the background. Stories set in a real location in a different time, brings the people of those parts of the world to life. Noor by Nnedi Okorafor is another science fiction novel that uses African culture as a backdrop. In it, I met Fulani herdsman which I knew nothing about before reading this fictional story.

Our Library also has some great children’s biographical picture books. The stories are true but placed in a story format. We even have graphical biographies which are wonderful fun to read.

black leapardWith so many options, you could make new acquaintances every day at the library. It’s OK if you don’t remember the title or the author or the name of the character. Ask one of us and we’ll help you locate it. We love to be asked, “What is the name of the book that has the colorful cover with eyes looking out at me?” We’ll start asking you questions and very likely find your book. “Is it about a tracker?”

“Yes,” you say and we answer with the title or walk you over to find the book. By the way, that is Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James which gives us a look into African history and mythology through a fictional tale.

Curiosity is great. Keep asking questions and discovering who else is out there.

Mar 03

Unconventional Mysteries: When You Want Something A Little Bit Different by Andrea Lorenz

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on March 3, 2022 at 4:47 PM by Genesis Gaule

I LOVE mysteries. I was practically raised on them. I started with Aunt Eater Solves a Mystery and Nate the Great then went from Encyclopedia Brown to Trixie Belden, Nancy Drew, and then straight to the loving embrace of Agatha Christie.

I do still love to have Miss Marple and Poirot as my detective companions, these days, I am often on the lookout for something a little different. So, in no particular order, here are a few unconventional mysteries I’ve enjoyed lately.


All Systems Red

The Murderbot Diaries #1
by Martha Wells

SCIENCE FICTION // All Systems Red is the first in a series of novellas by Martha Wells starring…..Murderbot, a self-named security android with a hacked governor unit. You might think that this would be a gory, violent redemption of robots story, but you’d be wrong. Murderbot just wants to be left alone to watch his shows, but the human scientists he’s been hired to protect keep getting almost killed, Murderbot knows they’ve been set up. Each Murderbot novella features Murderbot begrudgingly solving a mystery to save his human companions.


The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie

Flavia de Luce #1
by Alan Bradley

MYSTERY // Also in e-book // Alan Bradley’s mysteries feature the aspiring young chemist with a penchant for poisons, Flavia de Luce. Flavia lives in Buckshaw, a once grand mansion, with her father, two sisters, and a few servants. When she finds a dead body in the cucumber patch, rather than been frightened, Flavia perks up and begins investigating: “I wish I could say I was afraid, but I wasn’t. Quite the contrary. This was by far the most interesting thing that had ever happened to me in my entire life.”


Magic for Liars

by Sarah Gailey

SCIENCE FICTION // Imagine the Harry Potter mashed up with Sam Spade, and you’d come close to the feel of Magic For Liars. Ivy Gamble is happy with her life. She lives alone and works, mostly successfully, as a private investigator, but trouble comes calling in the form of her estranged sister: a magically gifted professor at a school for magical children. One of the faculty members of Osthorne Academy for Young Mages has been gruesomely murdered and Ivy, who has knowledge of the magical world AND solving mysteries, is the only one fit for the case.

Honorable Mentions

  1. The Last Policeman by Ben H. Winters
    A police detective investigates a murder as the world is ending.
  2. The Verifiers by Jane Pek
    FICTION // A client of a private investigation company that investigates if your dating app match is lying to you is murdered.
  3. The Forest of Stolen Girls by June Hur
    E-audiobook only // A girl poses as a man to investigate the mysterious disappearance of young girls on the island of Jeju, set in 15th century Korea.
  4. Powers by Brian Michael Bendis
    GRAPHIC NOVEL // A graphic novel series about cops investigating the murders of superheroes.