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'easy nonfiction'

Nov 04

There is a Book to Help by Vanesa Gomez

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on November 4, 2021 at 4:32 PM by Genesis Gaule

In a perfect world, children would never be exposed to difficulties and hardships. They would never have to grow up too soon or feel unsafe. They could simply be kids. Unfortunately, life doesn’t discriminate. When these struggles arise, it can be difficult to find a way to answer questions or work through their feelings in an age appropriate way. 

Books can be a great tool to help children (and adults!) find the words for their feelings and cope. Whether it is for more common obstacles like bullying and divorce or other sensitive issues like, poverty, domestic violence, immigrating to a new country, or death of a loved one, books can help provide advice and comfort. Picture books are also a great way to encourage empathy for others in children that may be living these situations. 

These books are best read together with plenty of time afterwards for questions. With books that deal with sensitive subjects, it is always good practice for a grownup to read the book beforehand, and determine if there is a struggle that you or your child is facing, there is a book to help.

Home Life

Divorce

Death / Loss

Bullying

Immigration

  • The Color Collector by Nicholas Solis and Renia Metallinou
    Topic: Homesickness, friendship // Easy SOLIS
  • My name is Sangoel by Karen Lynn Williams, Khadra Mohammed, and Catherine Stock
    Topic: Refugee, names // Easy WILLIAMS
  • Home is in Between by Mitali Perkins and Lavanya Naidu
    Topic: Traditions, culture // Easy PERKINS

People with Disabilities

Adoption

Sep 03

Do You Remember the Lyrics? by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 3, 2021 at 2:25 PM by Genesis Gaule

Are you singing the right lyrics to the songs you learned as a kid? I love to hear children sing. If the words aren’t quite the ones I remember, that doesn’t matter. They sing with their hearts and I can hum along, but do I remember the lyrics?

For the life of me, I cannot remember the lyrics to Somewhere Over the Rainbow. I obviously made up some words as a kid and that is how I remember it. Though sometimes, my curiosity (or the funny looks of my grandchildren) will cause me to find the original lyrics to some of my favorites.

home on the rangeThe Library can come to the rescue for lots of those songs especially in the Easy section. We can find Home On the Range edited by Barbie H. Schwaeber. It is based on a poem written by a Kansas homesteader, Dr. Brewster M. Higley. Others have tried to take credit for it and have tried to change the words. Ranchers, farmers and cowboys adopted the song as an unofficial anthem for the American West. Kansas adopted it as their state song. But how did it get to be so well known?

The story behind a song can be a lot of fun. Another book by the same title, Home On the Range: John A. Lomax and His Cowboy Songs by Deborah Hopkinson tells how as a young man, John went out with an old-fashioned recording device in the early 1900s to capture songs that were sung by cowboys. Then he wrote them down for us. He went out again later in life and captured more songs. Many of his recordings of singing cowboys are stored at the Library of Congress. I bet those cowboys would be surprised to know their voices live on in such a prestigious place!

take me out to ball gameTake Me Out to the Ball Game by Jack Norworth is another unofficial anthem. Baseball games would not be the same without this song even though we only sing one of the three verses. How many of us know the words to the other two?

To help us remember songs from our youth, the Library has a wonderful selection of DVDs called Sentimental Sing-Alongs. Their topics range from patriotic to romance and from locations all over the country.

We do grow up and discover new songs and with them singers who become favorites. Some write their own music and others have lyricists that create the words for them. There are those who redo an old classic with their own personality by changing up the music, but the lyrics live on.

Lyrics catch attention so they’re often used as titles like in these books owned by the library:

Jul 23

Books for a Rainy Day by Andrea Lorenz

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on July 23, 2021 at 10:27 AM by Genesis Gaule

As you’re lacing up your shoes, ready to go outside and enjoy the sunny day, you see a bright flash and then – one Mississippi, two Mississippi, three Mississippi – hear the low rumble of thunder. Rain? Today?! What a bummer! Lucky for you, your grown-up has just come back from the library and has a whole bunch of books they promise will keep you busy. Let’s see what they have, shall we?

bigfootBigfoot: Spotted At World-Famous Landmarks by D.L. Miller (Easy 001.944 MILLER) You take a peek inside this book. Oh!  Look at the detailed pictures! And you have to find a teeny tiny Bigfoot hidden in each picture! These are just like mom’s falling apart, old Where’s Waldo books, but cooler and new. You could spend hours looking for Bigfoot, footprints, tour guides, and more. As you turn the page, you see that there’s facts, history, and real pictures of each world-famous landmark that Bigfoot visits. Did you know that the Statue of Liberty’s index finger is 8 feet long?

choose-adventure-robotAfter you’ve found all of the Bigfoots, you turn to a goofy looking chapter book: Your Very Own Robot Goes Cuckoo-Bananas! by R.A. Montgomery (Junior MONTGOMERY) Hmm…The first page says “Read this first!!! Watch out! This book is different than every book you’ve ever read. YOU get to choose what happens next—and even how the story will end.” You like this idea. Nobody ever lets you choose anything. So you start reading about a whacky robot and his faithful kid until two things happen at the same time. Do you a. run toward the sound of a braking car? or b. go to Robot Cloning classes? For A. go to page 8, for B. page 10. You get to choose what happens through the whole book! You can even go back and re-read to see what COULD have happened. This is cool!

Okay, those were neat, but you’re getting a little antsy since you had to sit still for SO LONG. Your grown-up grabs Locomotion: March, Hop, Skip, Gallop, Run by Michael Dahl, illustrated by Beth Hughes (Easy 612.78 DAHL) and queues up some music from the book on their phone! You can read AND move along with the book!  

unicorn-yogaWhen you’ve made it through the whole book, your heart is racing. Your grown-up suggests that you try out Unicorn Yoga by Gina Cascone & Bryony Williams Sheppard, illustrated by Jennifer Sattler (Easy 613.7 CASCONE) to cool you off. Cat pose, cow pose, tiger and plank, there’s even one especially for you: child’s pose!

Whew! That was hard work. Good thing it’s time for lunch! You’re famished. You pull out Fish and Fowl: Easy and Awesome Sandwiches for Kids by Alison Deering and Bob Lentz (Easy 641.84 DEERING) and start paging through. Lox? EW! Tuna melt? Maybe. Chicken and waffles! YES! Your grown-up helps you gather ingredients and uses the oven to heat up the chicken. You toast the waffles, add some cheese, honey mustard and lettuce and then put it all together. YUM.

l-otto-funnNow that you’ve refueled, you want to do something hands-on. You pull the last book out of the library tote bag. The Secret Files of Professor L. Otto Funn: Or Stop Being a Slug, Open This Book, and Make Your Brain Happy (745.5 GORS). This looks like fun, or should you say FUNN? You look through the projects and choose three to do: The Crayon Rock Cycle, Create Your Own Masterpiece, and Minotaur Mask. Your grown-up asks if you deliberately chose the messiest projects. (You did). You creates new things from old things and learn about earth science, painting, and mythology along the way.

The next thing you know, it’s time to clean up for supper. Where did the time go? You ask your grown-up about the forecast for tomorrow. Will there be rain again? 

Extra Rainy Day Book Suggestions: