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'astronomy'

Feb 22

Book Notes 2/21/2022

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on February 22, 2022 at 1:14 PM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

2/21/2022


R.A.L.F. is back every other Thursday at 4 pm! We've got Random Awesome Library Fun for any kid in grades 6-12. More information...


Backyard Playgrounds by David Stiles and Jeanie Stiles

Build Amazing Treehouses, Ninja Projects, Obstacle Courses, and More! // In this book, Jean and David Stiles offer user-friendly plans and step-by-step instructions to help you build something great in your own backyard. They offer a range of easy, timeless projects that can be made in an afternoon—trolley ride, treasure chest, circle swing, lemonade stand—alongside more ambitious projects, like the warped wall and treehouse.

690.89 STILES


On Consolation by Michael Ignatieff

Finding Solace in Dark Times // When we lose someone we love, when we suffer loss or defeat, when catastrophe strikes-war, famine, pandemic-we go in search of consolation. Recreating the moments when great figures found the courage to confront their fate and the determination to continue unafraid, this book takes those stories into the present, movingly contending that we can revive these traditions of consolation to meet the anguish and uncertainties of our precarious 21st century.

152.4 IGNATIEFF


Profit and Punishment by Tony Messenger

How America Criminalizes the Poor in the Name of Justice // Tony Messenger has spent years in county and municipal courthouses documenting how poor Americans are convicted of minor crimes and then saddled with exorbitant fines and fees, then often sent to prison when they couldn't pay. In this remarkable feat of reporting, Messenger exposes the tragedy of modern-day debtors prisons, and how they destroy the lives of poor Americans swept up in a system designed to penalize the most impoverished.

362.5 MESSENGER


Cosmic Queries by Neil DeGrasse Tyson

StarTalk's Guide to Who We Are, How We Got Here, and Where We're Going // In this groundbreaking book, world-renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson tackles the world's thorniest philosophical conundrums, armed with wit, wisdom, and cutting-edge science. Together with distinguished physicist James Trefil, Tyson presents questions that have preoccupied humanity for millennia. Then, using the latest theories, from the Big Bang to string theory and the multiverse, he explores the answers, bolstered with stunning images and the latest insights from missions to planets, moon, asteroids, and beyond.

523.1 TYSON


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

Jul 16

Backyard Astronomy by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on July 16, 2021 at 1:40 PM by Genesis Gaule

My parents were the first ones to introduce me to the wonder of the night sky---showing me how to identify the Big Dipper, pointing out the Northern Lights on late night drives, and even waking me up in the middle of the night to watch a meteor shower. I can still picture me and my siblings huddled in our blankets with our parents eating Oreos at the end of our driveway, competing to see who could count the most “shooting stars.” One night, we were lucky enough to catch a fireball light up the sky! These cherished childhood memories, and more I’ve made along the way, continue to fuel my desire to venture out into the night to see what’s on display in the heavens.

And according to amsmeteors.org we might be in for a treat July 17 - August 26, 2021. Known for its high volume of meteors with clear persistent trains, the Perseids are one of the most popular showers in the Northern Hemisphere. This year, it will peak on August 11-12 when the moon is only 13% full and will set in the early evening, providing dark skies for this year’s Perseids. In cloudless rural locations, it may be possible to see 50-100 shower members per hour! Many of the meteors will radiate from a point in the constellation Perseus, but you’ll be able to see them in any part sky after 9:00pm. They tend to strengthen in numbers into midnight, with the most meteors just before dawn. 

So go enjoy a beautiful night under the stars--find yourself some dark sky, bring the snacks, and keep your fingers crossed for a fireball!

Want to dive a little deeper into backyard astronomy? Check out these titles from our library!

Constellations

A glow-in-the dark guide to the night sky
by Chris Sasaki

Easy 523.8 SASAKI // Bring your flashlight to storytime and explore the stars with this glow-in-the-dark picture book! Featuring the stories behind some of the most famous constellations, this child-friendly introduction to the night sky is a perfect mix of simple science and storytelling.


The Young Astronomer

A young enthusiast's guide to astronomy
by Harry Ford

520 FOR // Award-winning astronomer Harry Ford, brings a hands-on approach to astronomy to budding stargazers ages 10 and up. Filled with experiments and projects that help explain how a lunar eclipse happens, how to spot a planet, and how to make your own stargazing equipment.


Eyewitness Handbooks: Stars and Planets

A visual guide to the night sky
by Ian Ridpath

520 RID // New to the night sky? This practical field guide features clear, easy-to-use star charts and is a great introduction to constellations, the solar system, and celestial objects for middle-grade and high school readers.


Discovery Channel: Night sky

An Explore Your World Handbook
by Mary Kalamaras

520 KALAMARAS // Designed for astronomy enthusiasts new and seasoned alike, this authoritative field guide combines fascinating information on the fundamentals of the universe with practical advice for identification and observation techniques, full color star maps, and an alphabetical guide to all 88 constellations.


The Backyard Astronomer's Guide

Third Edition
by Terence Dickison and Alan Dyer

522 DICKINSON // Looking for a more technical approach to stargazing? This in-depth manual gets the amateur astronomer started identifying celestial objects, using telescopes, and photographing the night sky.

Apr 02

Our Next Exploration Goal: The Universe by Cody Rasmussen

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on April 2, 2021 at 10:13 AM by Genesis Gaule

milky-way-photographed
Space.  Since ancient times, mankind has looked to the sky and has wondered: what exists beyond our world? Seeing the stars they would believe that above our world was the realm of the gods and other celestial beings. This fascination with space and the unknown has passed through the millennia, resulting in spectacular feats of human ingenuity. Our reach for the stars has led us to create the first airplanes and jets, culminating in the creation of satellites, rockets and other spacecraft. We have landed humans on the Moon and sent rovers to Mars, we are in the process of attempting to plan settlements on the Moon and Mars. Mankind’s thirst for exploration has not abated in the slightest.

The Andromeda Galaxy

Space exploration has inspired authors to write fantastic works of science fiction, creating new worlds and alien races across the universe. Space Operas such as Star Wars and Star Trek have inspired our youth to continue to look at the stars in wonder.  The book series of Dune inspired scientists to name features of Saturn’s largest moon,Titan, after planets. New astronauts and engineers are going into training, hoping to continue to push the limits allowing humanity to explore new worlds.
first-space-shuttle-launched

Humanity has always known that space exploration would either remain a dream to last the ages, or would be our saving grace. We are slowly losing our home planet to ourselves, and over the next few centuries there will come a time when our world will need to make a choice. Whether we should stay on our planet and attempt to save it...or take to the stars and continue one of mankind's greatest desires: exploration.


After all, the Space Opera Star Trek says it best.


“Space: the final frontier.”