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Jan 21

Reading Out Loud by Linnea Benton

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on January 21, 2022 at 1:03 PM by Genesis Gaule

Welcome! I am so glad you are here! Now, please, pull up a chair and let me tell you a story…

“Once upon a time…”
“In the beginning…”
“It was a dark and stormy night…”
“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.”

Spark any memories? That last line? That’s one of my favorite beginnings. It goes back to bedtimes past, and sitting on my papa’s lap as he rocked and read to me. Later, it became one of the first lines I remember reading out loud myself. It became a fixture throughout the years as first one, then another sister joined the family and our reading circle grew. Even now, that line starts one of my favorite stories to share with my sons.

Stories are the cornerstone of humanity. They shape us and our understanding of the world around us. Sharing stories builds connections; between people, between places, and across time. Before the written word came in these wonderfully portable packages, storytellers brought information and entertainment to the people in cultures around the world.

Today, a book, a shared space, and a few minutes can go a long way. Research has shown that reading aloud, especially to young children, is one of our most powerful tools in building language and literacy skills, increasing attention spans, and strengthening relationships. It doesn’t even have to be limited to parents and children, or even just between humans! Adults can read out loud to themselves or each other and still benefit in many of the same ways. Recent studies reveal cognitive benefits of shared reading among dementia patients. Animal rescue organizations like the ASPCA have used reading aloud to help relax and build bonds with rescued animals. And, to bring us full circle, therapy animals are often used to build confidence and reading skills among children in schools and libraries.

Speaking of libraries…did you know that we have over 35,000 books available here at EGF Campbell Library? SO MANY STORIES!

And if you want to read more about storytelling and reading out loud, we even have a few books to help you out: 

The Enchanted Hour

by Meghan Cox Gurdon

The Miraculous Power of Reading Aloud in the Age of Distraction // Discover the dazzling cognitive and social-emotional benefits of reading together with scientific research, practical tips, and reading recommendations. // Nonfiction // Coming soon to our shelves (also available in e-book and e-audiobook)


How to Tell Stories to Children

by Silke Rode West & Joseph Sarosy

Early childhood educators show you how to become an expert storyteller and strengthen your relationship with your child with this surprisingly simple method. // Nonfiction // 372.677 WEST 2021


Bringing Up Bookmonsters

by Amber Ankowski, PhD & Andy Ankowski

The Joyful Way to Turn Your Child into a Fearless, Ravenous Reader // The no-stress, ferociously fun way to raise a kid who loves to read—complete with reading recommendations and activities to inspire. // Nonfiction // 372.4 ANKOWSKI 2021


Jan 07

Creatures of the Continents - Part 2: South America by Cody Rasmussen

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on January 7, 2022 at 4:02 PM by Genesis Gaule

llamas

"Humankind must begin to learn that the life of an animal is in no way less precious than our own."
-Paul Oxton

Upon this planet we call home, one can find a great multitude of forms of life. From the birds in the sky to the creatures beneath the waves, the creatures that move upon the earth to the ones that move below it. They are everywhere. Some can be seen in certain places around the world more than others. One of these places is none other than the South American continent.

sloth

South America is a place teeming with life. From the birds in the skies to the critters that make the mountains their home. From the vast canopies of the rainforests to the fish swimming through the rivers and lakes. It is truly a wondrous land. Up in the trees one may spot the slow-moving sloth, making its way from one branch to the next. The feline apex-predator, known as the jaguar, stalks the lands of the Amazon Rainforest. Amongst the Andean Mountains, those who look can even find the Andean Condor and Mountain Tapir making their homes.

snake

South America is home to a vast variety of reptiles and amphibians, and many are extremely dangerous. Such as the mighty anaconda and the poison dart frog. Then below the surface of the rivers and lakes is an entire world of creatures, like the Amazonian River Dolphin and the Giant River Otter. There is also the infamous piranha, which are actually known to have a diet that shifts with their age going from meat to plant and fruit materials, making them in fact omnivores.

piranha

The continent of South America has many wondrous creatures that call it home. The sounds echo throughout the wild, constantly reaffirming that life is bountiful there. Keep watch for the next blog post in this series, where it will be based on the creatures of Europe.

“Much of human behavior can be explained by watching the wild beasts around us. They are constantly teaching us things about ourselves and the way of the universe, but most people are too blind to watch and listen.”
-Suzy Kassem, "Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem"

More in this Series: Part 1: North America

Dec 17

A Cup of Tea by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on December 17, 2021 at 10:48 AM by Genesis Gaule

A lovely cup of hot tea and a good book: Perfection, especially on a cold day as winter moves through our area!

I don’t recommend eating peanut butter and jelly toast while reading. Certainly, don’t try Cheetos and a library book. Please, never eat mashed potatoes and gravy while enjoying your favorite story. But a cup of tea can be managed nicely.

There are so many kinds of teas and ways to enjoy them. I have a cupboard full and I’m always ready to try a flavor that is unfamiliar. If I’m reading something that requires some concentration, I’ll go with either a nettle tea (yes, stinging nettle) or Turkey Tail Astragalus made with the Turkey Tail mushroom and the root of astragalus. It’s thick enough to be a robust coffee but without the caffeine. Just right, for focusing in the evening.

If the day is stressful, chamomile cannot be beaten. It is a weaker tea, but with a longer steep time it is delicious. A lovely cup of green tea after lunch hits the spot to continue a work day.

The library has a few titles with some nummy tea recipes: The Healing Herbs by Michael Castleman, The Folk Remedy Encyclopedia by the Editors of FC&A Medical Publishing and our newest, Vibrant by Dr. Stacie Stephenson.

cloud-tea-monkeysThe history of tea includes like Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet. One of my favorite stories. I read it many times. It tells of a little girl who tries to harvest tea leaves in her mother’s place when she became sick. She was too tiny to do it, but the monkeys helped. Oops, already told you too much but the story gets even better from there.

Teas are intertwined with communities in many parts of the world. Sharing a cup with family or in a special ceremony is part of tradition and a memory-making event. Tea has had great value throughout history in the social aspect and the economic world. Remember the Boston Tea Party? It was an initial act of defiance by American colonists.

Traditionally, oolong is drunk with someone who you want to share an extended period of time. You steep it for only a minute and then enjoy. Steep the same leaves for a minute and a half, pour the second cup and visit a little more. Again the same leaves are steeped for 2 minutes while visiting with your dear friend.

Kids enjoy tea, too or at least the tea party. There are many children’s books where tea is central to the story. Even a song, remember I’m a Little Teapot? We have a book with that same name by Iza Trapani. While you’re looking for good tea books in the Easy Section, be sure to check out Tea with Grandpa by Barney Saltzberg.

I do believe it’s time for me to fill my cup again.