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'Holocaust'

Mar 23

2022 ALA Award Winners by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on March 23, 2022 at 11:53 AM by Genesis Gaule

The American Library Association (ALA) recently announced their 2022 Youth Media Awards which honors books, videos, and other outstanding materials for children and teens. Here are this year's winners and honorees we have in our catalog!

Looking for past award winners? Check out our post about the 2021 ALA Award Winners.


watercress

Watercress

by Andrea Wang, illustrated by Jason Chin

Simple text and beautiful illustrations pack a strong emotional punch in this autobiographical picture book about gathering wild watercress that brings a daughter of immigrants closer to her family's Chinese heritage. An author's note in the back shares Andrea's childhood experience with her parents. // Easy // Ages 4 - 8

Check out these children's cultural picks:

nicky vera


fox at night

Fox at Night

by written and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor

Fox overcomes his fear of monsters when he meets real nocturnal animals. With repeating text bolstered by whimsical illustrations that provide cues to the story’s humorous plot, Tabor deftly uses sensory stimuli of sight, sound and smell to immerse young readers into the perils of the night. // Easy Reader Yellow // Ages 4 - 8

More award winning kids books:

beak ally

  • Beak & Ally #1: Unlikely Friends written and illustrated by Norm Feuti
    Theodor Seuss Geisel Award (2022 Honor) // Junior Graphic Novel // Ages 6 - 10 years
  • Mel Fell written and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor
    Caldecott Medal (2022 Honor) // Easy // Ages 4 - 8 
  • Wonder Walkers written and by Micha Archer
    Caldecott Medal (2022 Honor) // Easy // Ages 3 - 7

firekeepers

Firekeeper's Daughter

by Angeline Boulley
[Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians]

When University of Michigan student Daunis witnesses a shocking murder, she reluctantly agrees to go undercover, drawing on her knowledge of chemistry and Ojibwe traditional medicine to track down the source of a new drug. It's a page-turning YA thriller with gorgeous insight into Anishinaabe culture and a healthy dose of romance thrown in. // Junior (also in e-book and e-audiobook) // Ages 14+

More Native American award winners:


telegraph club

Last Night at the Telegraph Club

by Malinda Lo

America in 1954 is not a safe place for two girls to fall in love, especially not in Chinatown. Red-Scare paranoia threatens everyone, including Chinese Americans like Lily. With deportation looming over her father—despite his hard-won citizenship—Lily and Kath risk everything to let their love see the light of day. // Junior // Ages 14+

More award winning books for teens:

  • We Are Not Free by Traci Chee
    Asian/Pacific American Award for Youth Literature (2022 Honor) // Michael L. Printz Award (2021 Honor) // Junior // Ages 12+
  • Temple Alley Summer written by Sachiko Kashiwaba, illustrated by Miho Satake, translated by Avery Fischer Udagawa
    Mildred L. Batchelder Award (2022 Winner) // Junior // Ages 8 - 13
  • Me (Moth) by Amber McBride
    John Steptoe New Talent Award (2022 Winner) // William C. Morris Award (2022 Honor) //  ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults (2022 Top 10) // Junior // Ages 14+
  • Ace of Spades by Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé
    William C. Morris Award (2022 Honor) // Junior (also in e-audiobook) // Ages 14+
  • Starfish by Lisa Fipps
    Michael L. Printz Award (2022 Honor) // Junior // Ages 10+
  • Concrete Rose by Angie Thomas
    Michael L. Printz Award (2022 Honor) // ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults (2022 Top 10) // Junior (also in e-book) // Ages 14+
  • Light from Uncommon Stars by Ryka Aoki
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences // Science Fiction
  • The Witch’s Heart by Genevieve Gornichec
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Science Fiction
  • Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwel
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Science Fiction
  • The Rose Code by Kate Quinn
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Fiction (also in e-book)
  • Lore Olympus, Vol. 1 by Rachel Smythe
    Alex Award (2022 Winner) // Graphic Novel
Apr 09

Life in Panels by Vanesa Gomez

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on April 9, 2021 at 2:41 PM by Genesis Gaule

I remember the day I fell in love with graphic novels. On the walk home from school my older sister had told me all about a type of Japanese book genre called manga, and the cool stories of headband clad ninjas, flexible pirates, and sword wielding soul reapers that she had been reading with her “big kid” friends. As a kindergartener, I thought everything my sister thought was cool was the best thing in the world. When it came to manga, it turned out to be true; although wearing a dress over jeans, not so much.

one punch man reading a graphic novelReading and rereading the first and only volume of Naruto we had until the pages were soft and worn was a ritual after school. Every trip to the library my sister and I would run right over to the small rotating bookshelves that housed the manga section and spend hours reading volume after volume standing up. Once I could navigate the internet, my obsession only grew. In addition to the mountains of traditional prose books I inhaled while at school, the manga I read was like candy that I couldn’t stop myself from getting a stomach ache from.

The diversity of genres that the storytelling medium offered broadened my horizons to ways of life, emotions, struggles I had never encountered in my day to day life. It wasn’t until I grew older that I learned about Western style graphic novels that went beyond the classic Marvel or DC superhero stories. While I will always hold manga near and dear to my heart, I have a newfound appreciation for western graphic novels.

If you are hesitant to jump into the deep end of teenager piloting fighting robots and brightly colored protagonists, here are a few western and eastern graphic novels to dip your toes into.

Maus: A Survivor's Tale

by Art Spiegelman

Our generation will soon become one of the last to hear first hand accounts of those that lived through the Holocaust. This meta story of the author listening to his father’s stories of life during this horrific time, is beautifully illustrated and will break your heart over and over.

The Magic Fish

by Le Nguyen Trung

The art itself is breathtaking, paired with riveting a narrative and take on identity struggles make this one of my all time favorites. Though marked as a junior graphic novel, this is a coming of age story for all ages.

Hey, Kiddo

by Jarrett J. Krosoczka

This autobiography graphic novel is a powerful story that tells the tale of comic book artist Jarrett Krosoczka’s upbringing with family addiction and how he found solace in art.

The Color of Earth

by Tong-Hwa Kim

This series is a Korean graphic novel, also known as a manwha, is about the daughter of a single mother and the budding romances they both experience. It is a look into Korean culture and a unique mother-daughter relationship they share.

The Prince and the Dressmaker

by Jen Wang

This award winning graphic novel is full of beautiful dresses, fleshed out characters, and life lessons for all ages.