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'First Nations'

Sep 07

Book Notes 9/6/2021

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on September 7, 2021 at 12:05 PM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

9/6/2021


Join us for our first art exhibit opening in over a year! Works from the River Forks Watercolor Society are on display September 10 - October 31. Opening reception: September 13 at 5:30 pm. More information


Untamed by Glennon Doyle

Soulful and uproarious, forceful and tender, Untamed is both a memoir and a galvanizing wake-up call. It offers a piercing, electrifying examination of the restrictive expectations women are issued from birth; shows how hustling to meet those expectations leaves women feeling dissatisfied and lost; and reveals that when we quit abandoning ourselves and instead abandon the world's expectations of us, we become women who can finally look at our lives and recognize: There She Is. Untamed shows us how to be brave. As Glennon insists: The braver we are, the luckier we get.

306.893 DOYLE | Also in e-book and e-audiobook


Northern Light by Kazim Ali

Power, Land, and the Memory of Water // An examination of the lingering effects of a hydroelectric power station on Pimicikamak sovereign territory in Manitoba, Canada. In a place where water is an integral part of social and cultural life, the Pimicikamak people demand accountablitily for the harm caused by the utiltiy. Here celebrated poet and essayist, Kazim Ali, explores questions of land and power as he reconnects with a lost connection to his childhood home Jenpeg.

811.6 ALI


The Burning Blue by Kevin Cook

The Untold Story of Christa McAuliffe and NASA's Challenger Disaster // January 28, 1986. NASA's space shuttle Challenger exploded after blasting off from Cape Canaveral. Christa McAuliffe, America's "Teacher in Space" was instantly killed, along with the other six members of the mission. At least that's what most of us remember. Cook tells us what really happened on that ill-fated, unforgettable day. He traces the pressures that triggered the fatal order to launch on an ice-cold Florida morning. He takes readers inside the shuttle for the agonizing minutes after the explosion, which the astronauts did indeed survive. Centering on McAuliffe, Cook reveals the human price the Challenger crew and America paid for politics, and the tragic cost of humanity setting its sight on the stars.

363.124 COOK


Seeing Ghosts by Kat Chow

A Memoir // Kat Chow has always been unusually fixated on death. She worried constantly about her parents dying---especially her mother. A vivacious and mischievous woman, Kat's mother made a morbid joke that would haunt her for years to come: when she died, she'd like to be stuffed and displayed in Kat's future apartment in order to always watch over her. After her mother dies unexpectedly from cancer, Kat, her sisters, and their father are plunged into a debilitating, lonely grief. With a distinct voice that is wry and heartfelt, Kat weaves together a story of the fallout of grief that follows her extended family as they emigrate from China and Hong Kong to Cuba and America. Seeing Ghosts asks what it means to reclaim and tell your family’s story: Is writing an exorcism or is it its own form of preservation? The result is an extraordinary new contribution to the literature of the American family, and a provocative and transformative meditation on who we become facing loss.

975.4 KURCZY


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Jul 30

Titles and Covers by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on July 30, 2021 at 1:21 PM by Genesis Gaule

How important is the title and cover of a book? The title is first seen as part of the cover. How much does that cover influence the reader? Who makes the decision about how that will look. Is it the author or publisher?

Remember, the old adage of not judging a book by its cover? In the explanation of that English idiom, the word ‘alone’ is often added. So go ahead and take a good look at the cover and let that help decide if a deeper look will follow. It won’t be the only factor, but it does influence our choices.

That sounds so easy, but there is a huge amount of time, talent and thought that goes into a cover design. The author has lived inside the book for months, maybe years and knows the story inside and out and upside down. Publishers take a different approach by wanting a cover that will attract potential readers. An illustrator will add a creative talent that takes the words and puts flesh on them or creates an abstract concept of the story line. Publishers often win out though the more bestsellers an author creates, the more influence she’ll apply to the design.

Sometimes covers will change if books are reproduced. Publishers will want them to be more timely or if a movie has been produced then a still picture might be placed on the cover. Books considered classics may see many covers as different publishers take turns at reviving them, such as The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

Cookbooks with colorful covers of food catch my attention every time such as The Elder Scrolls by Chelsea Monroe-Cassel. There are also books that I can’t take home because I find the covers too scary. 

Yes, I’m easily influenced by covers but what about titles?

Titles are influential also. Authors with their publishers will decide on a title. I have an author friend who agreed to change the title of her book when the publisher thought her choice wasn’t mysterious enough.

Too many titles are the same or so similar that readers get confused. I prefer titles that are more distinct like The Poppy War by R.F. Kuan (great cover) and Ancestor Approved edited by Cynthia Leitch Smith.

The individual words in a title can catch a reader’s attention. For me some favorites are tree, sand, herbs or seeds which is why I picked up The Seed Keeper by Diane Wilson. The cover is a picture of beading which is beautiful. The book is about seeds and plants. After picking it up and looking at it, I found that it takes place close to home--a good find for me based on a cover and title!


Jun 04

6 Regional Reads by Genesis Gaule

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on June 4, 2021 at 2:31 PM by Genesis Gaule

Books have the extraordinary ability to take you anywhere you can imagine: across the globe, to strange new worlds, back in time, or flung far into the future. They can even take you back home. There is a unique feeling of “hey I know that place” or “that character reminds me so much of my dad/mom/next door neighbor/etc” that I only get when reading books set in Minnesota and North Dakota written by people who lived here.

So if you are in the mood to journey through our own neck of the woods, here are 6 regional reads to take you there.

Fiction:

A Fireproof Home for the Bride

by Amy Scheibe
Fiction SCHEIBE 

Caught in a time bubble between a world war and the upheaval of the 1960's, 18-year-old Emmaline Nelson doesn’t have any say in her life or where it is headed. All her choices, especially who she will marry, are governed by her strict Lutheran parents. As her world opens up, she realizes that she longs to be something other than a farmer’s wife. But what can she do to escape the cage her parents have built for her? Peppered with charm and lush detail, this coming-of-age story of complicated family relationships, racial tension, and love is sure to transport you back to 1950’s Minnesota.

The Life We Bury

by Allen Eskens
Mystery ESKENS | Also in eBook and eAudiobook

A seemingly simple college assignment turns into deep dive to uncover the truth surrounding a brutal rape and murder. Tasked to interview a stranger and write a brief biography and his deadline looming, University of Minnesota college student Joe Talbert heads to a nearby nursing home to find a willing subject. There he meets Car Iverson--a Vietnam veteran and convicted murderer with only a few months to live--and Joe’s life is turned upside down. Part mystery and part character study, Eskens debut novel crafts believable characters with compelling interpersonal drama.

The Round House

by Louise Erdrich
Fiction ERDRICH

Based on a number of true stories over the past 20 years, The Round House looks deeply into the fallout after a woman living on the Ojibwe reservation in North Dakota is attacked in 1988. As she descends into solitude and her husband seeks justice, their 13-year-old son is left alone to look for answers and try to save his mother. Born in Little Falls, MN, raised in North Dakota, and an enrolled member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, Erdich is one of the most revered novelists of our time and a brilliant chronicler of Native-American life and culture.

Nonfiction:

Hundred Miles to Nowhere: An Unlikely Love Story

by Elisa Korenne
813.6 KORENNE

When singer-songwriter, Elisa Korenne, took a month’s sabbatical from New York to be an artist-in-residence in “middle-of-nowhere” Minnesota, she didn’t intend to stay. And she certainly didn’t intend to fall madly in love with the local outdoorsman/insurance guy. Her story is an honest and heartfelt reflection on the ups and downs of their love story, culture shock, and what it means to live in community.

The Horizontal World : Growing Up Wild in the Middle of Nowhere

by Debra Marquart
921 MARQUART

From a very early age, Debra Marquart--the youngest and wildest of five children--knew she wanted out of the confines of her life on the family farm in North Dakota. Yet, returning home after years away for her father’s funeral, Marquart finds herself discovering a newfound respect for her father and her connection to the land she was so desperate to escape. Chronicling her rebellious adolescent life on the farm and subsequent exodus, Marquart’s wry understated memoir will resonate with anyone who has spread their wings but still calls the Midwest “home.”

If You Lived Here You'd Be Home By Now: Why We Traded the Commuting Life for a Little House on the Prairie

by Christopher Ingraham
070.92 INGARHAM | Also in eAudiobook

If You Lived Here... is a candid story of writer Christopher Ingraham’s decision to uproot his life and move his family to Red Lake Falls, Minnesota—the community he made famous as “the worst place to live in America” in a story he wrote for the Washington Post. As Ingraham and his family acclimate to their new life, all their preconceptions—good and bad—are turned on their heads.