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Oct 09

Cooking my way through the library by Genesis Gaule

Posted on October 9, 2020 at 5:20 PM by Genesis Gaule

One of my favorite shelves in the library to peruse is the cookbook section (Nonfiction 641.5). There’s just something about flipping through pages of beautifully photographed food and reading the stories behind the recipes--it’s like getting a peek at someone’s else’s family and exploring their culture one dish at a time.

When one catches my eye, I can’t wait to take it home and dive in. Here are three such cookbooks from the library I am exploring now.

ultimate-bread

Ultimate Bread by Eric Treuille

If you are new to bread-making, Ultimate Bread is a great place to start. With photographed step-by-step techniques, ingredient information, and easy-to-follow instructions, they take the mystery out of bread-making. From naan to grissini to sandwich bread, there’s a wide sampling of various yeast, flat, and quick bread recipes from around the world to choose from. The muffin recipe is easily customizable and the hearty Irish Soda Bread and Victorian Milk Bread are both wonderful with a cup of stew or slathered with butter and jam. If you’re a chocoholic, be sure to give the Chocolate Prune Bread a try!

sioux-chef

The Sioux Chef's Indigenous Kitchen by Sean Sherman

The Sioux Chef Indigenous Kitchen

No fry bread or Indian tacos here! Oglala Lakota caterer and food educator based out of Minneapolis, Sean Sherman, shares his history, culture, and approach to creating authentic indigenous food specific to our northern Midwest region. Using traditional ingredients and techniques, Sean creates vibrant, healthful dishes that are elegant as well as accessible for the home cook. Through recipes such as Three Sisters Mash, Cedar Braised Bison, and Fried Wild Rice Bowl, he encourages you to explore traditional local flavors such as juniper, sumac, and cedar, but also offers substitutes if those ingredients are hard to find. The book is a great read on its own and a rich introduction to Native ideology and food.

indianish

Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family by Priya Krishna

Indian-ish is a loving tribute to Priya’s mom’s self-taught Indian-American cooking that merges the Indian flavors of her childhood with American staples. The results are approachable and packed with flavor. A few I’m eager to try include Dahi Toast (Spiced yogurt sandwiches), Aloo Gobi (Spiced potatoes with cauliflower), and Saag Feta (Feta cooked in spinach sauce). The book is also filled with funny stories, candid photos, and original illustrations that gives you the feeling of pulling up a chair at the Krishna dinner table.

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